Posts

Storm Shelters for Sale – Storm Shelters Huntsville AL

Storm Shelters for Sale - Storm Shelters Huntsville AL

Storm Shelters for Sale - Storm Shelters Huntsville AL

Huntsville, Alabama is #1 in the nation but it's not an honor that is desired or appreciated. And one that suggests storm shelters Huntsville Al would be a wise investment for homeowners in the region, and that many might be searching for storm shelters for sale from Safe-T-Shelter with the recent designation.

The Huntsville / Madison County area has been rated No. 1 in a weather.com ranking of the top tornado cities in the country. Birmingham, AL is listed as No. 3 on the list and Tuscaloosa, AL No. 4. The list was created by Dr. Greg Forbes, a top tornado expert for The Weather Channel. The weather.com report also highlights an interesting shift in the nation's most tornado-prone areas. While the plains states of Kansas and Oklahoma are considered by most to be tornado alley, the top four cities are all in the Deep South - with Jackson, Miss., sliding in at No. 2 among the four Alabama cities. Other Deep South cities on the list include Atlanta at No. 8 and Nashville at No. 10.

The story explains in great detail that, "Huntsville lies in the Tennessee Valley, surrounded by the hills of the Cumberland Plateau. It also lies within Dixie Alley, an area which is prone to violent, long-track tornadoes."Describing Birmingham, the website stated, "Images from Birmingham and Tuscaloosa in 2011 are burned into the public's memory. A massive EF-4 multi-vortex tornado ripped across the region. Dozens of cameras captured the monster twister as it ripped through both cities."According to the research, tornadoes have tracked 1,520 miles across Madison County (Huntsville AL) since 1962 - a measure qualified, to include a 75-mile radius around Huntsville, Alabama, which would stretch into surrounding counties.It highlights the nine 2011 tornadoes that touched down in Madison County and killed nine people as well as the 1989 tornado that obliterated Airport Road and killed 21 people.

That being said, tornado season is here, and that means that much of the country is at risk of severe weather for many months to come. The Spring is when most people become aware of the threat of tornadoes and with that comes increased interest in tornado storm shelters and tornado safe rooms. With a severe weather outbreak often on the horizon, below is a list of "Tips" to remember when a tornado watch or warning is in effect for your community.

Before diving into the list, Safe-T-Shelter specializes in steel safe rooms, and while we once designed, created, and installed underground storm shelters, we no longer advise clients to make investments in underground storm shelters, due to the technology advancements that now make our above ground steel storm shelters more safe and with additional benefits of ease of accessibility, cost, and installation.

A tornado safe room is a hardened structure specifically designed to meet the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) criteria and provide near-absolute protection in extreme weather events, including tornadoes and hurricanes. Near-absolute protection means that, based on our current knowledge of tornadoes and hurricanes, the occupants of a safe room built in accordance with FEMA guidance will have a very high probability of being protected from injury or death.To be considered a FEMA safe room, the structure must be designed and constructed to the guidelines specified in FEMA P-320, Taking Shelter from the Storm: Building a Safe Room for Your Home or Small Business and FEMA P-361, Safe Rooms for Tornadoes and Hurricanes: Guidance for Community and Residential Safe Rooms.

Tornado Shelters and Storm Shelters

Now for your 7 Tips to Survive a Tornado1. Determine a safe place to ride out the storm, preferably in advance. And a steel above ground storm shelter is your best option.

1) Do you live in a mobile home? Get out. Driving in a car? Get home as quickly as you can, and if that's not possible, get to a sturdy building as quickly and safely as possible.

2) Get away from windows and if you don't have a steel safe room, get underground if possible.Regardless of where you're taking shelter, it should be as far away from windows as possible. Even if a tornado doesn't hit, wind or hail could shatter windows, and if you're nearby, you could get hurt.If you do not have a basement move to the innermost room or hallway on the lowest floor of your home. The goal is to put as many walls between yourself and the outside world. When homes are destroyed by tornadoes, often, the outer walls have been demolished, but a few inner rooms are somewhat intact.

3) If a tornado appears while you're on the road ...You should make every effort to find a safe building for shelter. If you can't find one, NEVER stop under an overpass. Instead, find a ditch, get down and cover your head. Get as far from your vehicle as you can to prevent the possibility of it being moved and dropped on you.

4) Put on your shoes – and a bike, helmet (bike, motorcycle, etc.)If you're at home and severe weather is hitting your home, prepare for the worst. If your house is damaged by a tornado, you could end up walking through debris that's riddled with nails, glass shards and splintered wood. The best way to ensure your shoes aren't scattered is to put on a pair before the storm comes.If you own a bike helmet, be sure to put it on during a severe storm. It could save you from life-threatening head trauma if your home suffers a direct hit.

Storm Shelters for Sale - Storm Shelters Huntsville AL

5) Keep your pets on a leash or in a carrier, and bring them with you. They're family too, so make sure they go to a safe place with you. Make sure their collar is on for identification purposes, and keep them leashed if they're not in a crate. If your home is damaged by a tornado, it might not be familiar to them anymore, and they might wander.

6) Don't leave your home and try to drive away from a tornadoIf you made it home, stay there. Tornadoes can shift their path, and even if you think you're directly in the line of the storm, being inside shelter is safer than being inside a car. Traffic could keep you from getting out of the storm's path, or the tornado could change directions quickly.

7) Understand the severe weather terms

Severe thunderstorm watch: Conditions are conducive to the development of severe thunderstorms in and around the watch area. These storms produce hail of ¾ inch in diameter and/or wind gusts of at least 58 mph.

Severe thunderstorm warning: Issued when a severe thunderstorm has been observed by spotters or indicated on radar, and is occurring or imminent in the warning area. These warnings usually last for a period of 30 to 60 minutes.

Tornado watch: Conditions are favorable for the development of severe thunderstorms and multiple tornadoes in and around the watch area. People in the affected areas are encouraged to be vigilant in preparation for severe weather.

Tornado warning: Spotters have sighted a tornado or one has been indicated on radar, and is occurring or imminent in the warning area. When a tornado warning has been issued, people in the affected area are strongly encouraged to take cover immediately.

Tornado Warning Huntsville Alabama

The two basic types of storm shelters are underground storm shelters or above ground storm shelters.

No one has ever been killed in an above ground storm shelter or safe room or underground storm shelter that has been proven to be compliant with the guidelines set by FEMA.

Determining what type of tornado shelter is best for you is primarily based on personal preference. In order to help you find the storm shelter that meets your specific needs here are some helpful tips:

Best steel storm shelter for accessibility: Above ground safe rooms are the most optimal for accessibility. There are no steps to navigate therefore safe rooms can be easily accessed by those with mobility issues. Above ground steel Safe rooms with wheelchair accessible doors are readily available. They are perfect for those who are handicapped and for the elderly. If you are considering a long term solution, you may want to consider an above ground steel storm shelter or above ground steel safe room. As you age, or if something were to happen to hinder your mobility, you could always access your safe room easily.

Best storm shelter for convenience: Any shelter that can be installed inside your home is going to be ideal for convenience. If you are building a new home, any room in your home can be reinforced and used as a safe room. Pre-manufactured steel safe rooms / pre-manufactured steel storm shelters or prefab steel storm shelters / prefab steel safe rooms can be installed in the garage. If you are not able to have a tornado shelter installed inside your home then an outdoor shelter installed as close to the home as possible is the best solution. Convenience is key when you have to seek shelter immediately, and navigated pounding hail, rain, and/or debris is something you might have to deal with when running to your outdoor steel storm shelter.

Garage Storm Shelter Best storm shelter for longevity: Above ground steel storm shelters or above ground steel safe rooms take the cake when it comes to longevity. Over time concrete will become brittle. As the ground settles the concrete will also crack which will result in leaks. Fiberglass shelters are prone to fiberglass rot over an extended period of time. Steel is strong and extremely durable. Rust is eliminated if the shelter is painted properly and all surfaces exposed to the soil or water are coated with an epoxy.

If you are looking for a shelter that will last a lifetime, then a steel storm shelter from Safe-T-Shelter is your best option.

Best storm shelter for safety: As mentioned earlier in this article, “There’s no one authority to tell you what the best storm shelter is, nor can the federal government endorse a specific type of storm shelter as being ‘the best.’ To assess a shelters safety you want to make sure the shelter meets all of the standards set forth by FEMA as published in the FEMA P-320 document. Every storm shelter manufacturer designs their shelter differently and constructs the shelter of different materials. Each shelter should be assessed separately to ensure safety. For instance, all steel shelters are not equally safe. There are steel shelters that are manufactured with varying degrees of metal thickness, different door designs with varying locking mechanisms and hinges, and different ventilation systems. Each component should be assessed to ensure the shelter is constructed according to the guidelines set by FEMA. It is also important to note that there is no governing agency which regulates to the storm shelter industry. The standards set by FEMA are considered to be “guidelines” and are therefore voluntary for manufactures to follow. The consumer is ultimately responsible for ensuring the shelter they purchase is safe. Most people do not realize the storm shelter industry is unregulated and tend to take most manufactures at the their word when they claim they are “FEMA approved”. FEMA does not “approve” any shelters. They only set “guidelines”. The main components of a shelter that should be examined are the thickness of the material used to construct the body of the shelter, the door components, how the shelter is secured, and the ventilation system. These recommendations come from decades of protecting communities, businesses, and homeowners. Safe-T-Shelter has proven longevity in the industry, tests every shelter, and builds storm shelters and safe rooms to the top standards with the best materials and the best technology. Not to mention at extremely affordable pricing with financing available. If you are in search of Storm Shelters for Sale or Storm Shelters Huntsville AL, Safe-T-Shelter should be your first call at: 1-800-462-3648.

Storm Shelters for Sale - Storm Shelters Huntsville AL

Severe Weather Awareness-Why You Need an In House Safe Room or Outside Storm Shelter

Why You Need a Storm Shelter

In the United States there are approximately 1,200 tornadoes each year. Safe-T-Shelter has compiled the following notes on storm shelters and safe rooms for those of you thinking about safety in the wake of recent storms.

The US has the most tornadoes of any country in the world. Though we experience more than 1,200 each year, a busy year could see more than 1,500 tornadoes. The United States also has the strongest and most violent tornadoes of any country in the world because of our natural geography and size.

Assessing Your Risk / Tornado Preparedness
Building codes provide design data that offers guidance for weather, seismic, and other events. This weather data provides information like precipitation / snow loads and wind loads. No design guidelines for wind loads come close to the force exerted by severe weather events like tornadoes.  So, the major takeaway is easy.  Your home is not designed to withstand even a moderate tornado, to ensure your safety if a tornado strikes, you need a saferoom or storm shelter.

Basic wind speed information from the 2012 International Residential Code shows a wind speed of 90 mph for most of the US. Coastal areas receive higher wind speed ratings, up to 140 mph, because of hurricanes. Even moderate tornadoes like an F1 measured on the Enhanced Fujita Scale can exceed the wind load used to design our houses across the majority of the country.

NOAA’s National Climactic Data Center publishes information on extreme weather events, including tornadoes. Some of the statistics are shocking. For example, few would have guessed that Florida experienced more tornadoes, by a wide margin, on average than any other southeastern state from 1991 to 2010?

You can also use records from NOAA’s Storm Prediction Center to assess the risk for your specific location. The data from the SPC is also startling – there were 758 tornadoes in the United States just during April 2011. In addition to information on tornadoes, you can find a multitude of weather and seismic events recorded on government websites to help you assess your risk.

Safe Room & Storm Shelter Standards

The Federal Emergency Management Agency publishes a series of construction standards for buildings in areas known for weather-related hazards like hurricanes and tornadoes. FEMA has published a saferoom standard for these extreme weather events. FEMA describes storm shelters and safe rooms as, “a hardened structure specifically designed to meet the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) criteria and provide ‘near-absolute protection’ in extreme weather events, including tornadoes and hurricanes.”

Saferooms are typically above-ground rooms in your home. This is in contrast to a storm shelter that is often in a garage or even on a separate concrete pad elsewhere on your property. You can find FEMA’s guidance for saferooms in its P-320 “Taking Shelter from the Storm” document. Safe rooms and most storm shelters are designed for a small number of occupants that you’d expect in a home or small business. But at Safe-T-Shelter, we also produce shelters custom to any size requirement.  We can create a shelter to protect 1 or to protect 500+.  The ICC 500 standard from the International Code Council provides guidance for larger shelters that you’d expect for schools, municipalities, and commercial buildings.

Installing a safe room in an existing home can be a significant challenge because of the potential amount of demolition and structural work required, but many homes have locations under stairs, or walk in closets that can be retrofitted to perfectly contain a storm shelter, or allow for panels to be installed converting the existing structure into a perfectly safe solution. The room needs to be adequately connected to the structure and foundation of the house to resist the wind and other loads delivered in a weather event like a tornado or hurricane. Safe rooms are still best suited to be installed in the construction of a home, but don't let that deter you.  There are affordable solutions for everyone, that will allow for your family to be properly prepared for when the next storm strikes. 

If you’d like to add a shelter to your existing home, you can consider a prefabricated storm shelter or some modular designs like we discussed in the paragraph above.

While in previous years, the recommendation for storm shelters was for them to be installed underground, that is not longer the case.  New design standards and enhanced technologies have shifted thinking, and now aboveground storm shelters are the preferred solutions for a variety of reasons.  They have been tested to withstand winds and projectiles associated with EF5 winds, and do not pose the risks of entrapment and flooding that underground storm shelters do.  Additionally, above ground storm shelters are typically cheaper to install and build, meaning it will cost less to protect your family than ever before.

Municipalities across the country have also now created a storm shelter or safe room registry so they know to check each storm shelter to be sure people aren’t trapped inside. But having an above ground storm shelter means the likelihood of being trapped is much smaller, but you should still register your storm shelter with as many registry databases as possible. If your municipality doesn’t have a storm shelter registry, you should give more thought to where you locate your storm shelter access to reduce the potential of any obstruction limiting your ability to exit the stormshelter.

While some homes do have underground stormshelters, in garage storm shelters or basement storm shelters, if that is the route you choose to take, we highly recommend having the doors open exterior to the house.  If your home is destroyed, the last thing you want to have happen is have the house collapse on top of your exit from your storm shelter.  And even worse, if the water line breaks, and water enters your shelter, while you are unable to exit.  This is an unfortunate, and all too common reality when a large tornado strikes.

Another thing to consider before installing an underground storm shelter or underground safe room, is that access can be an issue when you need to use it.  The elderly, and those in a wheelchair might not be able to enter your shelter, defeating the purpose.  We recommend shelters that are wheelchair accessible, that have doors that are easy to open no matter a person's particular strength.   

Consider Your Pets
Don't forget to size your storm shelter to include your pets. It’s amazing to see how many people lose track of their pets when they’re separated during severe weather events. It’s also critical to have your pets microchipped so they can be identified and returned to you if you do become separated in a storm.

Tornado Shelters and Storm Shelters

Don't Wait, Pay Attention, and Utilize Your Storm Shelter Before it is Too Late.

Too many people rely on outdoor warning sirens to alert them though these are typically designed only to alert people who are outside – away from their weather radios. So please invest the $10 in a battery powered weather radio (be sure to change the batteries regularly, like a smoke alarm, each time the time changes).  There are also many apps that can be downloaded to your phone to provide additional coverage and alert you of weather events around your exact location.  But a warning is only beneficial if you act.  What’s the point of having a storm shelter if you don’t utilize it when you receive a warning?  Don't wait until the storm is moments away.  Camp out in your storm shelter or safe room, if necessary, until the threat has completely passed.  

You can also find active alerts on the National Weather Service website. This resource lets you check alerts by state so you can see weather event concerns even when you’re traveling.

Insurance Breaks?

It may be possible to get credit toward your premiums for code-plus construction that helps your home resist weather events, start by calling your agent.  

We also recommend that you inquire about flood insurance, even if you think you don’t need it. Weather events often include rain that can create flash flood events that aren’t covered under many home owner’s insurance policies, so ask about an addendum to your coverage. The fee increase would be nominal, but would protect you if something catastrophic happened.  We would hate for you to be in a situation where your home owner’s policy provider argues that damage was caused by water intrusion and is thus excluded from your standard coverage.

The Bottom Line, Why You Need a Storm Shelter

Many severe storms materialize with little, if any notice. There’s no time to pack up and escape, which means you need a better option than trying to ride out a tornado in your bathtub. Very few buildings are “storm proof,” but for a small investment, you can both protect your family and increase the value of your home. We can design and construct buildings that will protect you no matter how large the storm is, or how large your family is.

To protect your family from weather events, please consider starting with a narrow focus: a first aid kit, a weather radio and a storm shelter. 

If you need some help deciding the proper size or placement of a storm shelter / safe room, we are happy to consult with you for free to determine the best option for you and your family. 

Custom Tornado Shelters for any Amount of People

Excellent Communication. Great attention to detail, very attentive to our questions, and the delivery and install were faster than even expected!  We highly recommend Safe-T-Shelter.

Mr. Zeiler
Satisfied Customer
Commercial Storm Shelters

Tornado Preparedness Tips for School Systems and School Administrators Without School Storm Shelters

Tornado Preparedness Tips for School Systems and School Administrators Without School Storm Shelters

PREPARE A TORNADO SAFETY PLAN FOR YOUR SCHOOL…

The most important part of tornado safety in schools, and in similar logistical arrangements such as nursing homes, is to develop a good tornado safety plan tailored to your building design and ability to move people, if you don’t have a community storm shelter or commercial storm shelter at your school. Sample School SchematicI have found, through damage surveys and other visits, that a lot of schools settle for a cookbook-style, “one size fits all” approach to tornado safety — often based on outdated literature — which can be dangerous when considering the fact that every school is built differently. The basic concept in the schematic at right is usually correct; but it must be adapted to your unique school arrangements! For example, the idea of a relatively safe hallway becomes invalid if the hall is lined with plate glass, or if it has windows to the outdoors. Hallways can turn into wind tunnels filled with flying glass and other dangerous objects.

Ideally, the lowest possible level is the safest. However, in some large schools, there may not be enough time to direct all occupants of the upper floors into safe areas, or enough space in those lowest-floor safe areas to hold everyone. Ultimately, the school administrators need to evaluate the time, space, traffic flow and coordination needed to direct all the kids and staff down into safe areas in an organized manner. That will require a customized drill which will vary from building to building, so the guidelines here must be rather open-ended by necessity.

Some things to consider:

  • SECONDS COUNT. If it takes more than 2 or 3 minutes to move all upper-floor people down, things get really risky! Though the average lead (advance) time on tornado warnings has gone up a lot in recent years, remember that the average still includes some warnings with NO lead time, or just a minute or two. Warnings are not absolutely perfect, radars can’t see everything, and tornadoes don’t always touch down miles away and make themselves visible before hitting. Plan for a reasonable worst-case scenario — a tornado is spotted very closeby, and hits with little or no warning. That way, during the majority of cases when there are warnings with several minutes of lead time, the plan can be executed and those people are all in a safe place within one or two minutes of the first alert. That is the ultimate goal. Now, how do you define a “safe place?” There is no guaranteed “safe place” in a tornado; but…
  • FLYING DEBRIS is the biggest tornado hazard. That’s why one needs to put as many walls as possible between oneself and the tornado. Are there interior hallways, rooms or corridors on the second floor which are NOT exposed to the outside through windows, doors or walls of glass? If not, then it can turn into a death trap of flying broken glass. If there are enough enclosed places on the second floor with no direct exposure to the exterior, perhaps you can save the time needed to move people down one floor. But even then…
  • BUILDING STRENGTH: Architecturally, how sound is the construction of the main building? What interior parts can stay intact during total structural loads created by 150-200 mph winds (which exceed the speeds found in most tornadoes) from any direction? Is anyplace on an upper floor safe enough in such structural stresses? To best answer that, consult a professional architectural engineer — preferably one who has wind engineering experience. Sure, there are budgets to make; and such expertise won’t come cheap — but it can ultimately save lives. FEMA also has a discussion on construction of community tornado shelters, including those for schools. Other valuable sources for help are your local emergency manager’s office, and the Warning Coordination Meteorologist (WCM) at your nearest National Weather Service office.
  • NEW CONSTRUCTION: Although this guide is intended for existing facilities, many of the same concepts can be applied to making tornado-safe schools from the blueprint stage. The same questions about wind damage and tornado safety should be asked of the architects and engineers. Again, this is where a licensed engineer with wind engineering specialization would be the most beneficial; and the FEMA tornado shelter guides are great resources too. FEMA also offers positive examples from Kansas of school tornado-sheltering work. Even if hiring a professional engineer isn’t an option, the builder can line with concrete enough interior rooms in the school to create a series of safe rooms to hold students. Safe rooms aren’t just for houses! They can also be retrofitted into existing facilities; but that is usually much costlier than building them in new construction.
  • PORTABLE CLASSROOMS: These can be death traps. Portable classrooms are most often constructed like mobile homes; and they are just as dangerous. Any sound tornado safety plan must include getting students out of portable classrooms and into a safe area in the main building, as quickly as possible, to minimize the time spend outside and exposed to the elements. While the seconds spent outside will pose considerable risk, the danger inside the trailer is just as great. If feasible, students should be evacuated from portable classrooms before the storm threatens — before the warning, when a tornado or severe thunderstorm watch is issued. Remember: Tornadoes can occur with little or no advance warning. Moving those students inside the main building for every SPC watch may be a hassle; but it may also save precious seconds and the lives of students if a tornado or extremely severe thunderstorm hits later.
  • DANGER – GYMS and AUDITORIUMS: Large, open-span areas, such as gymnasiums, auditoriums and most lunchrooms, can be very dangerous even in weak tornadoes, and should not be used for sheltering people. This sort of room has inherent structural weaknesses with lack of roof support, making them especially prone to collapse with weaker wind loading than more compact areas of the same school building. Consider the aerial photo of Caledonia (MS) High School (below) as an outstanding example of this, when the near side was hit by a tornado in January 2008.

    The next photo shows the inside of the Childress (TX) High School gym after a May 2006 tornado. The tornado was rated F1 (weak, on the original F-scale) at the school, although it did do F2 damage elsewhere. This further illustrates the hazard of indoor areas with large roof spans, even in “weak” tornadoes.  Neither of these schools had a commercial storm shelter / community storm shelter onsite.


SOME ADVANCE STRATEGIES

A carefully developed tornado drill should be run several times a year to keep students and staff in good practice, and to work out any kinks in the drill before it is needed for real. Also, large and easy to read maps or signs with arrows should be posted throughout the hallways directing people to the safe areas. Here are some other important tips:

  • If the school’s alarm system relies on electricity, have a compressed air horn or megaphone to sound the alert in case of power failure.
  • Make special provisions for disabled students and those in portable classrooms. Portable classrooms are like mobile homes — exceptionally dangerous in a tornado.
  • Make sure someone knows how to turn off electricity and gas in the event the school is damaged.
  • Keep children at school beyond regular hours if threatening weather is expected; and inform parents of this policy. Children are safer deep within a school than in a bus or car. Students should not be sent home early if severe weather is approaching, because they may still be out on the roads when it hits.
  • Lunches or assemblies in large rooms should be postponed if severe weather is approaching. As illustrated above, gymnasiums, cafeterias, and auditoriums offer no meaningful protection from tornado-strength winds. Also, even if there is no tornado, severe thunderstorms can generate winds strong enough to cause major damage.
  • Know the county/parish in which your school sits, and keep a highway map nearby to follow storm movement from weather bulletins. Online maps and weather sources can be valuable, but if the power is out, it helps to have paper maps.
  • Have a NOAA Weather Radio with a warning alarm tone and battery back-up to receive warnings quickly and directly from your local National Weather Service office. A new technology called WRSAME allows you to set such weather radios to alarm for your county and surrounding counties; so look for the WRSAME feature when purchasing weather radio units.
  • Listen to radio and television for information when severe weather is likely. Outlooks and watches from the Storm Prediction Center can also help you be aware of the possibility of severe weather during the school day.
  • Get a custom school storm shelter from Safe-T-Shelter, which provides state-of-the-art above ground storm shelters of all sizes.

WHEN THE TORNADO THREATENS OR A TORNADO WARNING IS ISSUED…

Illustration of Tornado Safety PostureSeconds count. Follow the drill according to the plan you have developed. Lead all students to the designated safe places in a calm, orderly and firm manner. Everyone should then crouch low, head down, protecting the back of the head with the arms. Stay away from windows and large open rooms like gyms and auditoriums.


AFTER THE TORNADO…

Keep students assembled in an orderly manner, in a safe area away from broken glass and other sharp debris, and away from power lines, puddles containing power lines, and emergency traffic areas. While waiting for emergency personnel to arrive, carefully render aid to those who are injured. Keep everyone out of damaged parts of the school; chunks of debris or even that whole section of the building may fall down. Ensure nobody is using matches or lighters, in case of leaking natural gas pipes or fuel tanks nearby. It is very important for teachers, principals and other adult authority figures to set a calm example for students at the disaster scene, and reassure those who are shaken.


Remember, there is no such thing as guaranteed safety from a tornado. Freak accidents happen; and the most violent tornadoes can level and blow away all but the most intensely fortified structures. Extremely violent EF5 tornadoes are very rare, though; and even within one’s path, only a small area has EF5 damage. Most of any tornado’s damage track is actually much weaker and can be survived using sound safety practices.

The best precaution is a commercial storm shelter / community storm shelter for all school children and staff onsite and easily accessible from the school.  At Safe-T-Shelter, we specialize in these custom shelters and can make any shelter for any size requirement.  Please contact us for a custom quote on a commercial storm shelter / community storm shelter for you school system or school administrator.

Tornado Shelters and Storm Shelters

Science Suggests More Active Tornadoes than Ever Before-Tornado Shelters are More Important than Ever

dont-wait-7

Tornado Shelters, More Important than Ever

While there isn’t a long-term trend in the number of U.S. tornadoes stronger than EF0, several recent studies suggest the time distribution of those tornadoes and their tendency to cluster in outbreaks may be changing.  And more activity means having a plan in place to survive a storm is more important than ever.  And luckily, tornado shelters are less expensive and easier to install than in years past.

EF1 Tornado Days and Active Tornado Days

Fewer Tornado Days, But More Active Days

When eliminating EF0 tornadoes from yearly counts, which have steadily risen over the past few decades due to more extensive spotter networks, the implementation of Doppler radar, and advanced technology such as smartphones and social media, there is essentially no long-term yearly trend in the raw number of EF1 and stronger tornadoes.

However, the number of days with at least one EF1+ tornado in the U.S. has fallen from an average of 150 such days in the early 1970s to around 100 days in the first decade of the 21st century, according to an October 2014 study in the journal Science.

However, the study by noted tornado researchers Dr. Harold Brooks of the National Severe Storms Laboratory, Greg Carbin of NOAA’s Storm Prediction Center, and Dr. Patrick Marsh, also of NOAA/SPC, found the number of days with a large number of tornadoes is actually increasing over time.

“The frequency of days with more than 30 EF1+ (tornadoes) has increased from 0.5 to 1 days per year in the 1960s and 1970s to 3 days per year over the past decade,” says the Brooks et al. study.

In essence, we have fewer days with tornadoes, but are packing more of them into the days we have. “Approximately 20 percent of the annual tornadoes in the most recent decade have occurred on the three biggest days of each year,” says the Brooks et al. study.  So knowing what to do when severe weather strikes, and ideally, having a residential storm shelter, a community storm shelter easily accessible in your city, or a corporate storm shelter or commercial tornado shelter at your business or school is more important than ever.

Another recent study by Dr. James Elsner not only found a similar clustering of tornadoes into fewer days, but also a spatial clustering of tornadoes on those very active days.

“It appears that the risk of big tornado days with densely concentrated clusters of tornadoes is increasing,” Elsner says in the July 2014 study.
Large Swings in Monthly, Yearly Numbers

These clusters cause more damage in a defined area.  So instead of being concerned about a single rotation, and potentially feeling relieved after a tornado passes, it is extremely important to be more vigilant and aware of other tornadoes in the area.  Residential tornado shelters and community storm shelters are the best option to protect yourself from these unpredictable storms.

For only the second time since 1950, the first three weeks of March 2015 passed without a single tornado anywhere in the U.S.
Yet as recently as 2011, almost 1,700 tornadoes ripped across the nation, including 349 tornadoes in a four-day outbreak from April 25-28, the costliest tornado outbreak in U.S. history.

While year-to-year variability has long been prevalent in U.S. tornado counts, a 2014 study by Dr. Michael Tippett found volatility, a term he uses for variability in tornado counts, has increased since 2000.

Furthermore, the Brooks et al. study found the tendency for more monthly extreme highs and lows in EF1+ tornado counts in recent years.

“Excluding the zero-tornado months, there are more extreme months in the most recent 15 years of the database (1999-2013) than in the first 45 years,” says Brooks et al. 2014.

In other words, we’ve seen extreme high monthly tornado counts (758 tornadoes in April 2011, for example) and extreme low monthly tornado counts (March 2015, for example) more often over the past 15 years, a trend that may continue.

Of course, low tornado count years do not preclude significant tornadoes or tornado outbreaks. Despite the lowest three-year tornado count on record from 2012-2014, we still had destructive outbreaks in March 2012, in May 2013 (Moore and El Reno, Oklahoma), and April 2014 (Vilonia, Arkansas).

When Tornado Season Shifts Into Gear, Skewing Earlier in the Year-The Time to Install an Above Ground Tornado Shelter is NOW

Tornadoes can occur any time of year the overlap of sufficient moisture, atmospheric instability — relatively cold, dry air aloft overlying warm, humid air near the Earth’s surface — and a strong source of lift such as a warm front, dryline, strong jet-stream disturbance occur.

Because of that, it’s difficult to define a tornado season on a national scale as distinctly as, say, a hurricane season.

However, Brooks et al. tracked as a metric the occurrence of the year’s 50th EF1+ tornado to get a sense of whether the timing of the ramp-up in U.S. tornadoes typically seen in spring is changing.

While the long-term average date (March 22) hasn’t changed, Brooks et al. found a marked increase in the number of “late-start” and “early-start” years since the late 1990s. The four latest starts and five of the ten earliest starts to the season all occurred in the 1999-2013 period. These range from late January (1999 and 2008) to late April (2002, 2003, 2004 and 2010).

In essence, even the date the season kicks into a higher gear is becoming more volatile-so don’t wait to install your tornado shelter.

Climate Change Role?

Now, the toughest question: Is climate change playing a role in the increasing variability of the nation’s tornadoes?

The short answer is, possibly.

The challenge in answering this question is linking short-fuse events like tornadoes and tornado outbreaks to long-term changes in atmospheric parameters generally conducive for severe thunderstorms, such as instability and wind shear.

Studies by Dr. Jeff Trapp and Dr. Noah Diffenbaugh, among others, suggest atmospheric instability, driven by increased moisture, is expected to be greater in a warming climate. However, wind shear, crucial for the formation of supercells which can produce the strongest tornadoes, may diminish overall, but may feature more days with higher wind shear.

Therefore, the overall environment may be more conducive for severe thunderstorms (with large hail and damaging winds), but it remains unclear whether the number of tornadoes or even strong tornadoes would necessarily rise in a warming world.

This brings up an interesting possibility, a seasonal outlook for severe weather, similar to hurricane season outlooks.
“I suspect that ultimately knowing if a severe weather season will be above, below, or near normal would be important for reinsurance portfolios as an increasing amount of money is spent on hail and wind claims,” said Dr. Patrick Marsh from NOAA/SPC.

The best advice is don’t think that you can predict the severity of tornado season or even when it begins, and definitely do not wait until after a storm strikes to realize the need to purchase a storm shelter.  Tornado shelters of all sizes are more affordable than ever and Safe-T-Shelter even partners with local credit unions for financing.  Everyone deserves the right to protect their family from unpredictable storms.  So whether it is a residential storm shelter, a community storm shelter, a commercial storm shelter or a corporate storm shelter, Safe-T-Shelter can help, and our 20+ years experience means you can have confidence in our products and our longevity.

Residential Storm Shelters or Safe Rooms

After a Storm, Tornado Shelters for Sale, see Increased Interest

Tornado Shelters for Sale

Inquiries about tornado shelters for sale by Safe-T-Shelter storm shelters picked up immediately after deadly tornados hit Alabama in 2011 killing more than 235 statewide and injuring countless others.

Brent Mitchell would much rather reverse this business model.

“We sell a lot of shelters after a tornado goes through,” said Mitchell, chief operating officer of the Hartselle-based Aquamarine Enterprises, the maker of Safe-T-Shelter storm shelters.

“We’d much rather see people taking reasonable steps to be safe before the disaster.”

Mitchell and his wife Melanie are part of the family-owned and woman-owned business that has been keeping communities, families, businesses, and school children and administrators safe for more than 20 years across Tornado Alley.

Mitchell said people are encouraged to take shelter from high winds in a basement or an interior room without windows.

“Obviously, when you’re dealing with really big storms, like we see all over the Southeast, Midwest, and Southwest during tornado season, those precautions aren’t enough,”Mitchell said. “We saw a lot of houses across the state where there was nothing left but the foundation.”

“That’s when safe rooms provide extra protection from these unpredictable storms.”

Tornado Shelter Industry Leaders

Mitchell, his family, and their staff have dedicated a large portion of their lives to keep people safe.  They use rigorous standards, have each of their shelters tested and certified, use only the best materials, and ensure proper installation so that the recipients of the tornado shelter can have full confidence in their purchase.

Brent said his above ground storm shelters have been tested by Texas Tech Wind Institute to withstand EF5 tornadoes — the strongest category on the Enhanced Fujita Scale. The Safe-T-Shelter tornado shelters also exceed the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s projectile standard, which requires storm shelters to withstand debris hurled at 100 mph, Mitchell said.

Safe-T-Shelter has a showroom in Hartselle, AL where interested parties can see the quality of construction and determine the proper size to meet their needs.

Interest in storm shelters and reinforced safe rooms is on the rise, and with financing available at great rates, it is easier than ever to ensure the safety of your family when a tornado strikes, which often happens with little warning.

“Every year, there are so many severe storm systems, so much destruction in the news. It’s generated a large interest in tornado shelters for sale,” said Mitchell. “There has been a sharp increase in demand.”

Quality storm shelters come in all varieties: indoor and outdoor, above ground storm shelters or below, a designated safe room or a reinforced interior room that doubles as everyday living space, he said.

“We’ve been in the business of keeping people safe for a long time,” he said.

Above Ground Storm Shelters have Outpaced Underground Shelters in terms of Safety

Mitchell said underground storm shelters aren’t ideal for many reasons.

“Here comes the storm. The wind is blowing at massive speeds. Now it’s hailing. Many aren’t going to take their wife and baby out in the storm to get to the shelter.”

A Safe-T-Shelter storm shelter is typically installed closer to the home, often under an existing roof on an existing concrete pad/foundation.  They can be installed inside of a home, under stairs if the space exists, or can be placed away from a home on a concrete foundation poured to very detailed specifications to ensure proper safety.  The flexibility of the installation, the lower costs, and ease of financing has continued to make the acquisition easier for those interested in tornado shelters.

Because they build all the products that they sell, they are able to keep prices low, and are able to create storm shelters that can protect a single person or 500+.  Their experience protecting entire rural communities, schools, manufacturing facilities and businesses across the country gives them a unique perspective and ensures that they stay on top of new technologies and ‘creature comforts’ that make time spent in their storm shelters more comfortable. Prices begin around $5,000 based on the number of people that have to be protected and certain issues that affect the installation process..

Units come with forced-air ventilation, lighting, and an uninterruptible power source is also available.  Padded seats, bunks, storage boxes, and more are available to customize your shelter for your specific needs or desires.

“Especially for someone with disabilities in the household that can’t make it to the basement or an outside unit, our above ground storm shelters are ideal in that scenario.”

Mitchell said there is no way to know how many homes have storm shelters, but he knows not enough do.

He said, “All you have to do is follow news coverage after the latest tornado touches down to realize there aren’t enough.”

Storm Shelters and Safe Rooms have never been More Affordable

If there was a single takeaway for people reading this interview, Brent said:

“Don’t wait for tragedy to see the need!”



dont-wait-5

He elaborated, “They’re too rare right now — whether ours or some other company’s,” he said. “Not enough people are preparing for their safety, but interest is rising.”

Emergency supply kit

Some storms produce power outages that last for several days. Having the following items will help you cope:

Bottled water

Non-perishable food

Flashlights & extra batteries

Extra clothing & blankets

An extra set of keys & cash

Medications & first aid kit

Personal hygiene items

Pet supplies

A weather alert radio or portable AM/FM radio

Safety Shelters are the New ‘Updated Kitchen’ in Real Estate

Tornado Shelters for Sale by Safe-T-Shelter are a sound investment, not only for the safety of your family, but they have been proven to increase the value of your home.

Above Ground Storm Shelters are Safer than Underground Storm Shelters

Above Ground Storm Shelters are the Safest Option

Popular opinion in many parts of the country is that when a tornado is bearing down on a community, the only safe place to take shelter is below ground. Joseph has found that this flies in the face of 15 years of research done at Texas Tech University’s National Wind Institute investigating the safety of above-ground storm shelters. He discusses findings from the Moore, OK, tragedy as well as several additional benefits of above-ground shelters. In addition, he shows video of TTU’s Debris Impact Facility firing 15-pound, 2″ by 4″ wood beams at 100 mph to show what tornadic debris can do to a normal home and how a storm shelter keeps occupants safe.

Following the recent devastating tornadoes we heard from many of you asking how to be certain a safe room will keep your family safe through a large tornado.

Alex Ryan was there when the EF-5 tornado barreled into Birmingham.

“When you see a tornado that is that big you have no choice. It’s either find cover or die,” he said.

John Melton also rode out the storm. He and his family didn’t have a safe room so they took to their cellar.

“We locked the cellar door when we saw it coming and it got louder and the next thing you know you see the latch coming undone and you couldn’t reach for it and it ripped open the door. Glass and debris started slamming on us,” John said.

The Meltons all survived but many people have asked us in the wake of the deadly storms which type of safe room is best.  We have made, and installed both for 21+ years, so we have a unique perspective with evidence to support our stance.

Amidst the debris in the path of the EF-5 tornado that tore through Alabama we found safe rooms that survived; both above and below ground.

But we wanted to know whether above or below ground is safest because just as the Alabama tornado began to hit, people were being told the only safe place to be is underground.

FEMA says in the right safe room your family will have near absolute protection even in storms whipping up to 250 miles per hour.

Nathan Evans and his family took to their safe room as the deadly Huntsville tornado descended on them.

“Usually the ones that come around here they kind of come close but never had a direct hit,” said Nathan.

This time it was a direct hit.

The storm sucked the door open on the family’s underground safe room.

“It was scary in respect that I thought I might lose someone in my family.”

It’s a worst case scenario: 250 mph wind with flying debris.

Could above ground safe rooms /  above ground storm shelters hold as well? 

To find out we traveled to the Texas Tech Wind Research Center. At the facility in Lubbock, Texas scientists use a wind cannon to launch wood and metal to simulate wind and damaging storm debris. It can produce EF-5 level tornado damage.

The cannon simulates wind of 250 mph. The researchers line up a safe room to take the hits with objects including 2×4’s fired at the shelter’s most vulnerable spots such as away from studs and into the door.  A storm shelter would be considered a failure if the steel is pushed inward more than three inches.

The cannon fires a series of EF-5 level shots. The safe room performs perfectly.

Barely any evidence of impact exists on the tornado shelter, no holes and the door remains sealed. The shelter would also remain attached to the ground during a tornado. Huge, specially-made bolts driven into at least 4 inches of concrete prevent this shelter from being picked up or pushed over.

A lot of individuals can’t go underground (and we further discuss what to do if an underground shelter is not an option here). Some have underground shelters, but they aren’t able to get into those shelters when the storm hits, or as a result of an array of factors, an underground storm shelter is not possible where they live.  Above ground storm shelters are easier and less expensive to install, which makes them more accessible to consumers.

So now, back to our question — which is superior?  Above or below ground storm shelters?

Larry Tanner, research associate at the Wind Research Center, says most importantly your safe room must be designed and built to FEMA guidelines.

“They’re all safe if they are tested products,” said Tanner.  And all our tornado shelters are tested.

However, in a below ground safe room you face the risk of debris blocking the exit, or flooding (when a tornado demolishes a home, it typically exposes a water line that can and often does lead to flooding in underground storm shelters).

The good news: No one has ever been killed in an approved above ground storm shelter.

And after seeing video footage of cars picked up and tossed by tornadoes many people ask whether above ground safe rooms will stand up to cars falling out of the sky?

Tanner says safe rooms built to FEMA guidelines handle a 3,000 pound vehicle being dropped on them no problem.

“The 57 Cadillac draping over the sides of the shelter. That’s virtually what we see all the time,” Tanner said.

The bottom line, based on a plethora of evidence, is that above ground storm shelters are the best option to protect you and your loved ones.
Above Ground Storm Shelters

A Residential Storm Shelter Offers Unmatched Storm Protection, and Peace of Mind.

Safe Rooms are the New ‘Must Have’ in New Construction

Residential Storm Shelters or Safe Rooms

Dual-Use Safe Rooms

A room where you can store jewelry, guns, send your email–and survive 250 mph tornado winds? It’s called a storm shelter or “safe room” and is a surprisingly popular home renovation, even during downturns in the real estate market.  But especially now with home sales spiking across the country.  The biggest market increase has been see with more people adding storm shelters and safe rooms to the design process for their newly constructed homes.

These aren’t the dank bunkers your father hid in. Many of the new shelters are above-ground storm shelters prefabricated and installed on concrete pads inside a garage or as a stand alone in your yard, or even installed inside the home. They are prefabricated storm shelters or custom safe rooms based on your needs and often lead double lives as offices, tool sheds, or even as wine cellars in less turbulent times.

Storm Shelters for New Construction

Many home builders include safe rooms /storm shelters in new custom homes, calling it a “must-have item.” The Federal Emergency Management Agency, which publishes safe room construction guidelines, says that information is now the agency’s “most requested” publication. And the National Storm Shelter Association estimates U.S. storm shelters number in the low millions, most of them having been added in the last decade.  And for many rural communities, it is becoming common for municipalities to install large community storm shelters for its citizens.

The aging 76 million Baby Boomers are a driving force behind much of the boom (pardon the pun) in storm shelter sales . Above-ground storm shelter designs are particularly popular among families with elderly members who might not be able to navigate stairs or make it across the yard into a bunker quickly. And recent studies have shown that above-ground shelters are just as safe, and in many cases safer than their underground storm shelter counterparts (Article discussing the safety of above ground storm shelters).  Sizes typically range from around 50 square feet to upward of 200 square feet on larger models and some can be equipped with electricity, restrooms, and other creature comforts based on need or desire.

Tornado Alley is not the Only Area Showing Increases in Storm Shelter Purchases

While storm-prone states are key target markets, many people in states not known for tornado outbreaks are purchasing the shelters for peace of mind.  And recent NOAA data has shown that nearly all states have had devastating tornadoes in recent years.

Intrigued? Check out our gallery of photos, or contact us for more information.

Why You Need a Storm Shelter and What to do if You Do Not Have One!

Storm Shelters, Safe Rooms, and Tornado Shelters

A reinforced safe room (or above-ground tornado shelter) is as good as an underground shelter. Residential Safe rooms are specially-designed reinforced tornado shelters built into homes, schools and other buildings. The Federal Emergency Management Agency (or FEMA), in close cooperation with experts in wind engineering and tornado damage, has developed detailed guidelines for constructing a safe room and the storm shelters built by Safe-T-Shelter meet or exceed those specifications.

If No Reinforced Storm Shelter is Available

If you’re like most people, you don’t have a residential tornado shelter. In this case, you need to find a location that is…

  • As close to the ground as possible
  • As far inside the building as possible
  • Away from doors, windows and outside walls
  • In as small of a room as possible

If you don’t have a saferoom, basement, panic room, above ground storm shelter, or underground storm shelter, what should you do? Remembering the basics of tornado safety, you should look around your home to determine the best place.  You should also seek out community storm shelters in you city or municipality before a storm threatens your community.

Alternate Ideas if a Storm is Coming and You Don’t have a Safe Room

  • Bathrooms

    Bathrooms MAY be a good shelter, provided they are not along an outside wall and have no windows. Contrary to popular belief, there is nothing magically safe about getting in a bathtub with a mattress. In some cases, this might be a great shelter. However, it depends on where your bathroom is. If your bathroom has windows and is along an outside wall, it’s probably not the best shelter.

    Bathrooms have proven to be adequate tornado shelters in many cases for a couple of reasons. First, bathrooms are typically small rooms with no windows in the middle of a building. Secondly, it is thought that the plumbing within the walls of a bathroom helps to add some structural strength to the room.

    However, with tornadoes there are no absolutes, and you should look closely at your home when determining your shelter area.

  • Closets

    A small interior closet might be a shelter. Again, the closet should be as deep inside the building as possible, with no outside walls, doors or windows. Be sure to close the door and cover up.

  • Hallways

    If a hallway is your shelter area, be sure to shut all doors. Again, the goal is to create as many barriers as possible between you and the flying debris in and near a tornado. To be an effective shelter, a hallway should as be far inside the building as possible and should not have any openings to the outside (windows and doors).

  • Under Stairs

The space underneath a stairwell could be used as a shelter.

If you Live in an Apartment without a Tornado Shelter, Storm Shelter, Safe Room, or Panic Room

The basic tornado safety guidelines apply if you live in an apartment. Get to the lowest floor, with as many walls between you and the outside as possible.

Apartment dwellers should have a plan, particularly if you live on the upper floors. If your complex does not have a reinforced storm shelter, you should make arrangements to get to an apartment on the lowest floor possible.

In some cases, the apartment clubhouse or laundry room may be used as a shelter, provided the basic safety guidelines are followed. You need to have a shelter area that’s accessible at all times of the day or night.