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Storm Shelters for Sale – Storm Shelters Huntsville AL

Storm Shelters for Sale - Storm Shelters Huntsville AL

Storm Shelters for Sale - Storm Shelters Huntsville AL

Huntsville, Alabama is #1 in the nation but it's not an honor that is desired or appreciated. And one that suggests storm shelters Huntsville Al would be a wise investment for homeowners in the region, and that many might be searching for storm shelters for sale from Safe-T-Shelter with the recent designation.

The Huntsville / Madison County area has been rated No. 1 in a weather.com ranking of the top tornado cities in the country. Birmingham, AL is listed as No. 3 on the list and Tuscaloosa, AL No. 4. The list was created by Dr. Greg Forbes, a top tornado expert for The Weather Channel. The weather.com report also highlights an interesting shift in the nation's most tornado-prone areas. While the plains states of Kansas and Oklahoma are considered by most to be tornado alley, the top four cities are all in the Deep South - with Jackson, Miss., sliding in at No. 2 among the four Alabama cities. Other Deep South cities on the list include Atlanta at No. 8 and Nashville at No. 10.

The story explains in great detail that, "Huntsville lies in the Tennessee Valley, surrounded by the hills of the Cumberland Plateau. It also lies within Dixie Alley, an area which is prone to violent, long-track tornadoes."Describing Birmingham, the website stated, "Images from Birmingham and Tuscaloosa in 2011 are burned into the public's memory. A massive EF-4 multi-vortex tornado ripped across the region. Dozens of cameras captured the monster twister as it ripped through both cities."According to the research, tornadoes have tracked 1,520 miles across Madison County (Huntsville AL) since 1962 - a measure qualified, to include a 75-mile radius around Huntsville, Alabama, which would stretch into surrounding counties.It highlights the nine 2011 tornadoes that touched down in Madison County and killed nine people as well as the 1989 tornado that obliterated Airport Road and killed 21 people.

That being said, tornado season is here, and that means that much of the country is at risk of severe weather for many months to come. The Spring is when most people become aware of the threat of tornadoes and with that comes increased interest in tornado storm shelters and tornado safe rooms. With a severe weather outbreak often on the horizon, below is a list of "Tips" to remember when a tornado watch or warning is in effect for your community.

Before diving into the list, Safe-T-Shelter specializes in steel safe rooms, and while we once designed, created, and installed underground storm shelters, we no longer advise clients to make investments in underground storm shelters, due to the technology advancements that now make our above ground steel storm shelters more safe and with additional benefits of ease of accessibility, cost, and installation.

A tornado safe room is a hardened structure specifically designed to meet the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) criteria and provide near-absolute protection in extreme weather events, including tornadoes and hurricanes. Near-absolute protection means that, based on our current knowledge of tornadoes and hurricanes, the occupants of a safe room built in accordance with FEMA guidance will have a very high probability of being protected from injury or death.To be considered a FEMA safe room, the structure must be designed and constructed to the guidelines specified in FEMA P-320, Taking Shelter from the Storm: Building a Safe Room for Your Home or Small Business and FEMA P-361, Safe Rooms for Tornadoes and Hurricanes: Guidance for Community and Residential Safe Rooms.

Tornado Shelters and Storm Shelters

Now for your 7 Tips to Survive a Tornado1. Determine a safe place to ride out the storm, preferably in advance. And a steel above ground storm shelter is your best option.

1) Do you live in a mobile home? Get out. Driving in a car? Get home as quickly as you can, and if that's not possible, get to a sturdy building as quickly and safely as possible.

2) Get away from windows and if you don't have a steel safe room, get underground if possible.Regardless of where you're taking shelter, it should be as far away from windows as possible. Even if a tornado doesn't hit, wind or hail could shatter windows, and if you're nearby, you could get hurt.If you do not have a basement move to the innermost room or hallway on the lowest floor of your home. The goal is to put as many walls between yourself and the outside world. When homes are destroyed by tornadoes, often, the outer walls have been demolished, but a few inner rooms are somewhat intact.

3) If a tornado appears while you're on the road ...You should make every effort to find a safe building for shelter. If you can't find one, NEVER stop under an overpass. Instead, find a ditch, get down and cover your head. Get as far from your vehicle as you can to prevent the possibility of it being moved and dropped on you.

4) Put on your shoes – and a bike, helmet (bike, motorcycle, etc.)If you're at home and severe weather is hitting your home, prepare for the worst. If your house is damaged by a tornado, you could end up walking through debris that's riddled with nails, glass shards and splintered wood. The best way to ensure your shoes aren't scattered is to put on a pair before the storm comes.If you own a bike helmet, be sure to put it on during a severe storm. It could save you from life-threatening head trauma if your home suffers a direct hit.

Storm Shelters for Sale - Storm Shelters Huntsville AL

5) Keep your pets on a leash or in a carrier, and bring them with you. They're family too, so make sure they go to a safe place with you. Make sure their collar is on for identification purposes, and keep them leashed if they're not in a crate. If your home is damaged by a tornado, it might not be familiar to them anymore, and they might wander.

6) Don't leave your home and try to drive away from a tornadoIf you made it home, stay there. Tornadoes can shift their path, and even if you think you're directly in the line of the storm, being inside shelter is safer than being inside a car. Traffic could keep you from getting out of the storm's path, or the tornado could change directions quickly.

7) Understand the severe weather terms

Severe thunderstorm watch: Conditions are conducive to the development of severe thunderstorms in and around the watch area. These storms produce hail of ¾ inch in diameter and/or wind gusts of at least 58 mph.

Severe thunderstorm warning: Issued when a severe thunderstorm has been observed by spotters or indicated on radar, and is occurring or imminent in the warning area. These warnings usually last for a period of 30 to 60 minutes.

Tornado watch: Conditions are favorable for the development of severe thunderstorms and multiple tornadoes in and around the watch area. People in the affected areas are encouraged to be vigilant in preparation for severe weather.

Tornado warning: Spotters have sighted a tornado or one has been indicated on radar, and is occurring or imminent in the warning area. When a tornado warning has been issued, people in the affected area are strongly encouraged to take cover immediately.

Tornado Warning Huntsville Alabama

The two basic types of storm shelters are underground storm shelters or above ground storm shelters.

No one has ever been killed in an above ground storm shelter or safe room or underground storm shelter that has been proven to be compliant with the guidelines set by FEMA.

Determining what type of tornado shelter is best for you is primarily based on personal preference. In order to help you find the storm shelter that meets your specific needs here are some helpful tips:

Best steel storm shelter for accessibility: Above ground safe rooms are the most optimal for accessibility. There are no steps to navigate therefore safe rooms can be easily accessed by those with mobility issues. Above ground steel Safe rooms with wheelchair accessible doors are readily available. They are perfect for those who are handicapped and for the elderly. If you are considering a long term solution, you may want to consider an above ground steel storm shelter or above ground steel safe room. As you age, or if something were to happen to hinder your mobility, you could always access your safe room easily.

Best storm shelter for convenience: Any shelter that can be installed inside your home is going to be ideal for convenience. If you are building a new home, any room in your home can be reinforced and used as a safe room. Pre-manufactured steel safe rooms / pre-manufactured steel storm shelters or prefab steel storm shelters / prefab steel safe rooms can be installed in the garage. If you are not able to have a tornado shelter installed inside your home then an outdoor shelter installed as close to the home as possible is the best solution. Convenience is key when you have to seek shelter immediately, and navigated pounding hail, rain, and/or debris is something you might have to deal with when running to your outdoor steel storm shelter.

Garage Storm Shelter Best storm shelter for longevity: Above ground steel storm shelters or above ground steel safe rooms take the cake when it comes to longevity. Over time concrete will become brittle. As the ground settles the concrete will also crack which will result in leaks. Fiberglass shelters are prone to fiberglass rot over an extended period of time. Steel is strong and extremely durable. Rust is eliminated if the shelter is painted properly and all surfaces exposed to the soil or water are coated with an epoxy.

If you are looking for a shelter that will last a lifetime, then a steel storm shelter from Safe-T-Shelter is your best option.

Best storm shelter for safety: As mentioned earlier in this article, “There’s no one authority to tell you what the best storm shelter is, nor can the federal government endorse a specific type of storm shelter as being ‘the best.’ To assess a shelters safety you want to make sure the shelter meets all of the standards set forth by FEMA as published in the FEMA P-320 document. Every storm shelter manufacturer designs their shelter differently and constructs the shelter of different materials. Each shelter should be assessed separately to ensure safety. For instance, all steel shelters are not equally safe. There are steel shelters that are manufactured with varying degrees of metal thickness, different door designs with varying locking mechanisms and hinges, and different ventilation systems. Each component should be assessed to ensure the shelter is constructed according to the guidelines set by FEMA. It is also important to note that there is no governing agency which regulates to the storm shelter industry. The standards set by FEMA are considered to be “guidelines” and are therefore voluntary for manufactures to follow. The consumer is ultimately responsible for ensuring the shelter they purchase is safe. Most people do not realize the storm shelter industry is unregulated and tend to take most manufactures at the their word when they claim they are “FEMA approved”. FEMA does not “approve” any shelters. They only set “guidelines”. The main components of a shelter that should be examined are the thickness of the material used to construct the body of the shelter, the door components, how the shelter is secured, and the ventilation system. These recommendations come from decades of protecting communities, businesses, and homeowners. Safe-T-Shelter has proven longevity in the industry, tests every shelter, and builds storm shelters and safe rooms to the top standards with the best materials and the best technology. Not to mention at extremely affordable pricing with financing available. If you are in search of Storm Shelters for Sale or Storm Shelters Huntsville AL, Safe-T-Shelter should be your first call at: 1-800-462-3648.

Storm Shelters for Sale - Storm Shelters Huntsville AL

Severe Weather Awareness-Why You Need an In House Safe Room or Outside Storm Shelter

Why You Need a Storm Shelter

In the United States there are approximately 1,200 tornadoes each year. Safe-T-Shelter has compiled the following notes on storm shelters and safe rooms for those of you thinking about safety in the wake of recent storms.

The US has the most tornadoes of any country in the world. Though we experience more than 1,200 each year, a busy year could see more than 1,500 tornadoes. The United States also has the strongest and most violent tornadoes of any country in the world because of our natural geography and size.

Assessing Your Risk / Tornado Preparedness
Building codes provide design data that offers guidance for weather, seismic, and other events. This weather data provides information like precipitation / snow loads and wind loads. No design guidelines for wind loads come close to the force exerted by severe weather events like tornadoes.  So, the major takeaway is easy.  Your home is not designed to withstand even a moderate tornado, to ensure your safety if a tornado strikes, you need a saferoom or storm shelter.

Basic wind speed information from the 2012 International Residential Code shows a wind speed of 90 mph for most of the US. Coastal areas receive higher wind speed ratings, up to 140 mph, because of hurricanes. Even moderate tornadoes like an F1 measured on the Enhanced Fujita Scale can exceed the wind load used to design our houses across the majority of the country.

NOAA’s National Climactic Data Center publishes information on extreme weather events, including tornadoes. Some of the statistics are shocking. For example, few would have guessed that Florida experienced more tornadoes, by a wide margin, on average than any other southeastern state from 1991 to 2010?

You can also use records from NOAA’s Storm Prediction Center to assess the risk for your specific location. The data from the SPC is also startling – there were 758 tornadoes in the United States just during April 2011. In addition to information on tornadoes, you can find a multitude of weather and seismic events recorded on government websites to help you assess your risk.

Safe Room & Storm Shelter Standards

The Federal Emergency Management Agency publishes a series of construction standards for buildings in areas known for weather-related hazards like hurricanes and tornadoes. FEMA has published a saferoom standard for these extreme weather events. FEMA describes storm shelters and safe rooms as, “a hardened structure specifically designed to meet the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) criteria and provide ‘near-absolute protection’ in extreme weather events, including tornadoes and hurricanes.”

Saferooms are typically above-ground rooms in your home. This is in contrast to a storm shelter that is often in a garage or even on a separate concrete pad elsewhere on your property. You can find FEMA’s guidance for saferooms in its P-320 “Taking Shelter from the Storm” document. Safe rooms and most storm shelters are designed for a small number of occupants that you’d expect in a home or small business. But at Safe-T-Shelter, we also produce shelters custom to any size requirement.  We can create a shelter to protect 1 or to protect 500+.  The ICC 500 standard from the International Code Council provides guidance for larger shelters that you’d expect for schools, municipalities, and commercial buildings.

Installing a safe room in an existing home can be a significant challenge because of the potential amount of demolition and structural work required, but many homes have locations under stairs, or walk in closets that can be retrofitted to perfectly contain a storm shelter, or allow for panels to be installed converting the existing structure into a perfectly safe solution. The room needs to be adequately connected to the structure and foundation of the house to resist the wind and other loads delivered in a weather event like a tornado or hurricane. Safe rooms are still best suited to be installed in the construction of a home, but don't let that deter you.  There are affordable solutions for everyone, that will allow for your family to be properly prepared for when the next storm strikes. 

If you’d like to add a shelter to your existing home, you can consider a prefabricated storm shelter or some modular designs like we discussed in the paragraph above.

While in previous years, the recommendation for storm shelters was for them to be installed underground, that is not longer the case.  New design standards and enhanced technologies have shifted thinking, and now aboveground storm shelters are the preferred solutions for a variety of reasons.  They have been tested to withstand winds and projectiles associated with EF5 winds, and do not pose the risks of entrapment and flooding that underground storm shelters do.  Additionally, above ground storm shelters are typically cheaper to install and build, meaning it will cost less to protect your family than ever before.

Municipalities across the country have also now created a storm shelter or safe room registry so they know to check each storm shelter to be sure people aren’t trapped inside. But having an above ground storm shelter means the likelihood of being trapped is much smaller, but you should still register your storm shelter with as many registry databases as possible. If your municipality doesn’t have a storm shelter registry, you should give more thought to where you locate your storm shelter access to reduce the potential of any obstruction limiting your ability to exit the stormshelter.

While some homes do have underground stormshelters, in garage storm shelters or basement storm shelters, if that is the route you choose to take, we highly recommend having the doors open exterior to the house.  If your home is destroyed, the last thing you want to have happen is have the house collapse on top of your exit from your storm shelter.  And even worse, if the water line breaks, and water enters your shelter, while you are unable to exit.  This is an unfortunate, and all too common reality when a large tornado strikes.

Another thing to consider before installing an underground storm shelter or underground safe room, is that access can be an issue when you need to use it.  The elderly, and those in a wheelchair might not be able to enter your shelter, defeating the purpose.  We recommend shelters that are wheelchair accessible, that have doors that are easy to open no matter a person's particular strength.   

Consider Your Pets
Don't forget to size your storm shelter to include your pets. It’s amazing to see how many people lose track of their pets when they’re separated during severe weather events. It’s also critical to have your pets microchipped so they can be identified and returned to you if you do become separated in a storm.

Tornado Shelters and Storm Shelters

Don't Wait, Pay Attention, and Utilize Your Storm Shelter Before it is Too Late.

Too many people rely on outdoor warning sirens to alert them though these are typically designed only to alert people who are outside – away from their weather radios. So please invest the $10 in a battery powered weather radio (be sure to change the batteries regularly, like a smoke alarm, each time the time changes).  There are also many apps that can be downloaded to your phone to provide additional coverage and alert you of weather events around your exact location.  But a warning is only beneficial if you act.  What’s the point of having a storm shelter if you don’t utilize it when you receive a warning?  Don't wait until the storm is moments away.  Camp out in your storm shelter or safe room, if necessary, until the threat has completely passed.  

You can also find active alerts on the National Weather Service website. This resource lets you check alerts by state so you can see weather event concerns even when you’re traveling.

Insurance Breaks?

It may be possible to get credit toward your premiums for code-plus construction that helps your home resist weather events, start by calling your agent.  

We also recommend that you inquire about flood insurance, even if you think you don’t need it. Weather events often include rain that can create flash flood events that aren’t covered under many home owner’s insurance policies, so ask about an addendum to your coverage. The fee increase would be nominal, but would protect you if something catastrophic happened.  We would hate for you to be in a situation where your home owner’s policy provider argues that damage was caused by water intrusion and is thus excluded from your standard coverage.

The Bottom Line, Why You Need a Storm Shelter

Many severe storms materialize with little, if any notice. There’s no time to pack up and escape, which means you need a better option than trying to ride out a tornado in your bathtub. Very few buildings are “storm proof,” but for a small investment, you can both protect your family and increase the value of your home. We can design and construct buildings that will protect you no matter how large the storm is, or how large your family is.

To protect your family from weather events, please consider starting with a narrow focus: a first aid kit, a weather radio and a storm shelter. 

If you need some help deciding the proper size or placement of a storm shelter / safe room, we are happy to consult with you for free to determine the best option for you and your family. 

Custom Tornado Shelters for any Amount of People

Excellent Communication. Great attention to detail, very attentive to our questions, and the delivery and install were faster than even expected!  We highly recommend Safe-T-Shelter.

Mr. Zeiler
Satisfied Customer

No Basement, No Problem…with an Above Ground Storm Shelter!

Basements scarce in Moore, Oklahoma – CNN.com

 

No Basement, No Problem…with an Above Ground Storm Shelter!

It’s one of the most familiar pieces of advice from authorities to people in the path of a tornado: Get into your basement. Yet few homes in the Oklahoma City area have them — even though that state is hit by far more powerful tornadoes than most others.

“Probably less than one tenth of one percent” of the houses in Moore are built with basements, said Mike Hancock, president of Basement Contractors in Edmond, Oklahoma. “There’s just such a misconception that you cannot do it.”

Why?

Hancock cited the area’s high groundwater levels and heavy clay as among the reasons some people believe — wrongly, he said — that basements are tough to construct.

But improved waterproofing methods can obviate the first; and the second, too, is surmountable, according to Hancock, who said he has built more than 600 basements in the Oklahoma City area over the past 15 years.

 Tornado shelters save lives! 

“We do ’em all day long,” he said. “I’ve got 32 basements to put in the ground right now.”

The city of Moore was the epicenter of an EF5 tornado Monday that decimated neighborhoods in the Oklahoma City area, leaving at least 24 dead.

Inside a tornado-ravaged school

In Moore, other issues can dissuade new home buyers from investing in basements, Hancock said. One is that there are so few other such houses that comparable values are tough to estimate, “so appraisers don’t give you any credit.”

In fact, basements are so rare in the area that real estate listings do not include “basement” as an option under foundation types, he said.

“You can list it in the comments section, but that’s not a foundation type.” That means it’s hard for house hunters to narrow their searches to houses with basements, which makes it harder still for sellers who have built houses with basements to recoup their investments, he said.

Moore in bull’s-eye twice, science may know why

Mike Barnett, a custom homebuilder in the area for 37 years, estimated that some 2% of residents have basements, and 10% to 15% “have some kind of cellar.”

None of the homes in his partially completed, 51-house development, called Autumn Oaks, has a basement, he said. Though it was spared Monday’s storms, “a block north of us it looks like Bosnia,” he said. He plans to build a community shelter that would accommodate all of its residents.

Alternatives exist: An above-ground shelter runs $8,000 to $10,000; a small basement would cost $15,000 to $20,000; and a concrete cellar built during new-house construction would cost as little as $2,200, said Barnett.

Tornado prediction is improving, scientists say

Accessibility an important element

Basements provide good protection if equipped with a suitable door and a concrete roof, but basements of pier-beam houses would leave their occupants exposed and vulnerable if the structure above them were blown away, said Ernst Kiesling, a former professor of civil engineering at Texas Tech.

Kiesling created the concept of the above-ground storm shelter after a tornado swept through Lubbock, Texas, in 1970, killing 26 people and demolishing scores of homes.

EF5 tornadoes are terrifying perfect storms

In addition, it is difficult to make basements compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act, said Kiesling, who is on the research faculty at the school’s National Wind Institute.

Above-ground storm shelters are easy to make accessible to those who are physically challenged, “and I would say that accessibility is a very important element,” Kiesling said.

Specially reinforced safe rooms provide “near absolute occupant protection from even the worst-case tornado,” he said.

How can we be safe from tornadoes?

Other products include steel, concrete and plastic shelters; above-ground and below-ground shelters; indoor and outdoor shelters; and shelters that fit underneath the garage slab.

The extra cost of incorporating a basement into plans for a house depends on where it is being built. “If you’re in the colder climates, then one has to put the foundation walls several feet deep to get below the frost line,” Kiesling said.

A region’s frost line marks where the ground no longer freezes and is an important variable when installing pipes. The added cost of digging down the extra couple of feet needed to make a basement for a house in the Northeast is relatively small, he said. “If you’re that deep, you’re pretty well along forming the shell for the basement.”

But in the Southwest, where the frost line is only about 18 inches below ground, the added incremental cost of digging out a basement would be far steeper, said the Texan.

“Here, houses are typically built by placing a slab on the surface and building above it.”

The making of a nightmare tornado (You Need a Storm Shelter!)

Lessons to be learned

Kiesling is also executive director of the National Storm Shelter Association, a nonprofit group that focuses on improving the quality of storm shelters.

He was planning Tuesday to organize teams to travel to Moore to study which structures failed and which performed well. “There’s a lot of lessons we can learn from this,” he said.

Kiesling said he had heard news reports citing underground shelters as the only safe places Monday in Moore. “That causes my blood to curdle, because I’ve spent my career developing safe places above ground,” he said.

Monday’s disaster is expected to lead to renewed calls to ensure that new houses are equipped with some sort of protection, said Leslie Chapman-Henderson, president and CEO of the Federal Alliance for Safe Homes.

But don’t count on them to effect change.

“What happens is that time and fading memories are the worst enemies,” she said. “People think it can’t happen twice, but in the case of Moore, Oklahoma, the tragedy here is this is the third strike — 1999 to 2003.”

After each of those strikes, homebuilders pledged never again to build homes without including safe rooms, she said. Though many followed through on their vows, more work remains, she noted.

Above Ground Storm Shelters as Effective as Below Ground Shelters

NewsOn6.com – Tulsa, OK – News, Weather, Video and Sports – KOTV.com |

MOORE, Oklahoma –

The massive storm that hit central Oklahoma last week has shined a light on safe rooms and storm shelters.

More than 3,000 shelters are registered in the city of Moore, and the city says everyone who took shelter inside one of them survived the storm.

The violent path of the tornado can be seen everywhere in the Moore neighborhood. Mindy Chaddock and family made it through the over 200-mile-an-hour winds by huddling in a storm shelter.

“People describe it as a train feeling–it wasn’t anything like that. I mean, the whole thing was shaking,” Chaddock said.

The one that saved her family is a below ground shelter; the most common kind of shelter in the neighborhood.

“This storm–I don’t see how you can survive in a bathtub or a closet, because, even in a shelter, we were scared for our life. That’s how strong it was,” Chaddock said.

“We’re looking, right now, for anything that was used to survive the tornado,” said Tom Bennett.

Bennett is a News On 6 weather producer, as well as president of Jim Giles Safe Rooms and past president of the National Storm Shelter Association or NSSA.

Members of that organization have been surveying in Moore, looking at the safe rooms and storm shelters to see how they performed during the tornado.

Complete Coverage: May 2013 Tornado Outbreak

Bennett said they haven’t seen a case, yet, of either an above ground or below ground shelter failing in the storm.

Bennett said while there is some minor damage to some of the above ground shelters, like the turbines flying off or the handles being bent, there’s nothing that would lead to tragedy.

“We’re not seeing anything here that caused injury or death. If you were in a safe room, whether it was above ground or below ground, you survived the tornado,” Bennett said.

Chaddock said she’s thankful to the Chickasaw tribe for installing the shelter for her grandmother and hopes everyone knows how important shelters are, no matter the cost.

“It’s 100 percent worth it. I mean, if you value your life and you value your children’s life, it’s 100 percent worth it,” she said.

Wind engineers from Texas Tech University are also in Moore. They’re reporting to FEMA about what the wind did to all of the structures–the buildings, the schools, even the storm shelters.

Community Storm Shelters

Tennessee Valley Tornado Shelter Locations (separated by County)

List updated April 2015

CHEROKEE COUNTY

Industrial Blvd, next to Leesburg Town Hall
Leesburg, AL
Holds 150-200 people

COLBERT COUNTY

14439 County Line Road
Ford City/Leighton
Holds 100+ people

8856 Main Street
Leighton
Holds 100+ people

1448 Jackson Highway
Littleville
Holds 100+ people

1211 2nd Street
Cherokee
Holds 100+ people

Colbert County EMA Office
120 West 5th Street
Tuscumbia
Holds about 50 people

Intersection of County Line Road and 2nd Street (Underwood Crossroads)
12491 County Line Road
Leighton
Holds about 80 people

Rose Trail Park
37 Rose Trail Park
Riverton (next to Riverton VFD)
Holds about 80 people

Nitrate City Volunteer Fire Dept.
1341 Alabama Avenue
Muscle Shoals
Holds about 80 people

Highway 247 Volunteer Fire Dept.
4639 Highway 247
Tuscumbia
Holds 40 people

2848 Denton Road
Tuscumbia
Holds 40 people

County Yard, Tuscumbia
914 South Hickory Street
Tuscumbia
Holds about 80 people

Colbert Alloys Park
191 Alloys Park Lane
Muscle Shoals
Holds about 80 people

Updated April 7, 2014. Colbert County has plans to add 14 more shelters in the next few years.

CULLMAN COUNTY

Baileyton
112 Fairview Rd
Capacity: 96
No pets

Chapel Village/Jones Chapel
74 County Rd 1034, Cullman, AL 35057
Capacity 90-100
No pets

Cullman County Courthouse Basement
500 2nd Ave SW, Cullman, AL 35055
No pets

Dodge City Town Hall – basement
130 Howard Circle, Hanceville, AL 35077
(basement was built to storm shelter standards)

Dodge City Volunteer Fire Department
7150 County Rd 223
Capacity: 96
No pets

Fairview Housing Authority
501 1st Ave SW
Capacity: 90-100
No pets

Garden City Town Hall
501 1st Ave SW
Capacity: 450+ people
No pets

Good Hope City Hall (Basement)
134 Town Hall Dr, Cullman, AL 35057
Capacity: 100
No pets

Good Hope freestanding shelter behind City Hall
Accessed via Madison Dr.
Capacity: 96
No pets

Good Hope Volunteer Fire Department #2
301 Day Gap Rd
Capacity: 96
No pets

Hanceville – three shelters:
202 Bangor Avenue SE
1407 Commercial Street SE
203 Michelle Street NW
No pets

Smith Lake Park
420 County Rd 385
Capacity: 96
No pets

South Vinemont
88 Ridgeway St
Capacity: 96
No pets

Vinemont Providence Volunteer Fire Department #1
576 County Rd 1355, Vinemont, AL 35179
Capacity: 200
No pets

Vinemont Providence Volunteer Fire Department #2
60 Ridgeway St
Capacity: 200
No pets

West Point
4050 County Rd 1141
Capacity: 96
No pets

DEKALB COUNTY

Crossville, at the fire department
96 people

DeKalb County Activities Building
Fort Payne
(basement – can hold about 200 people)

Fyffe Senior Center
413 Graves Street
(Holds about 20 people)

Fyffe Town Hall
Holds 96 people

Fyffe Church of God
778 Main Street, Fyffe
(256) 623-3822
(please call first to see if shelter is open)

Geraldine Town Hall
96 people

Greenbriar Avenue
Henagar (holds 96 people)

Main Street, Powell (across from Town Hall)
Holds 96 people

Northeast Alabama Community College
Rainsville
Opening at 9:00 p.m.
Shelter holds 1000-1500 people

Plainview School
Shelter can hold 600-700 people

Shiloh, at fire department
96 people

Sylvania, next to fire department
14 Enterprise Street
Sylvania, AL 35988
Holds 96 people

Upper Sand Mountain Parish (private-run shelter)
24474 Sylvania Road
Sylvania, AL 35988

ETOWAH COUNTY

The Gadsden/Etowah County EMA has a website where you can see all open shelters on a map to find the closest to you. Click here to view that map.

Bethlehem Missionary Baptist Church
5950 Sardis Rd, Boaz, Al 35956
Handicap Accessible

Black Creek Volunteer Fire Department
20 Styles Bridge Rd, Collinsville, AL 35961
Handicap Accessible
Pets Allowed

Etowah Baptist Association
853 Walnut St.
Downtown Gadsden
Handicap Accessible

First Baptist Church Southside
2560 Mountain View Dr, Southside, AL 35907
Handicap Accessible
Pets Allowed with Crates

First Baptist Church of Hokes Bluff
5052 Main St, Hokes Bluff, AL 35903
Handicap Accessible

Gadsden Public Library
254 College St.
Downtown Gadsden
Handicap Accessible
Pets Allowed

Goodyear Heights Baptist Church
608 Kaying Rd. N
E. Gadsden/Glencoe
Handicap Accessible

New Bethel First Congressional Methodist Church
6673 Main St, Hokes Bluff, AL 35903
Handicap Accessible
Pets Allowed with Crates

NE Etowah Community Center
3733 US Hwy 411 N
Nothern Etowah County, Near Gaston School
Handicap Accessible
Pets Allowed
FEMA P-361 Compliant

Paden Baptist Church
900 Padenreich Ave
Near Gadsden State Community College
Handicap Accessible

Stowers Hill Baptist Church
407 Ninth Ave. SW, Attalla, AL 35954
Handicap Accessible
Pets Allowed with Crates

Young’s Chapel Methodist Church
44 Youngs Chapel Rd
Hokes Bluff/Piedmont
Handicap Accessible
Pets Allowed with Crates

FRANKLIN COUNTY

Shelter behind Hodges City Hall
1842 Hwy. 172
Hodges

Phil Campbell Community Center
132 Sherry Bryce Dr.
Phil Campbell

Blue Springs Fire Department
Highway 75
Phil Campbell

Vina Fire Department
79 Church Street
Vina

Red Bay Water Park
640 2nd St NE
Red Bay

Red Bay Old Airport
627 9th Ave NW
Red Bay

Russellville Park & Rec Center
204 Ash Ave
Russellville

511 Gaines Ave
Russellville

Pleasant Site Fire Department
2785 Hwy. 90
Pleasant Site

Burnout Fire Department
75 Hwy 224
Burnout

Shelter Near Belgreen School Gym
14141 Hwy 187
Belgreen

JACKSON COUNTY

Bridgeport Shelter
602 Broadway Ave, Bridgeport, AL

Bridgeport Shelter
2105 5th St, Bridgeport, AL

Dutton Town Hall
69 Browntown Road (Basement)
Holds 250-300 people

Jackson County Courthouse (basement)
123 East Laurel Street
Scottsboro
(256) 574-9330
Occupancy: 100

Langston Safe Room
9277 County Rd. 67, Langston, AL

Section City Hall
72 Dutton Rd, Section, AL
Basement

Paint Rock Shelter
3227 U.S. Highway 72, Paint Rock, AL

Stevenson Shelter
905 E. 2nd Street, Stevenson, AL

Stevenson Shelter
802 Kentucky Ave, Stevenson, AL

LAUDERDALE COUNTY

North Wood United Methodist Church
1129 N Wood Ave
Florence, AL

Petersville Church of Christ
3601 Cloverdale Rd.
Florence, AL

Underwood/Petersville Community Center
840 County Road7
Florence, AL

Stoney Point Church of Christ
1755 County Road 24
Florence, AL

Williams Chapel Presbyterian Church
6401 County Road 1
Waterloo, AL

Killen United Methodist Church
201 J.C. Mauldin Hwy.
Killen, AL

Bank Independent
11250 Hwy. 101
Lexington, AL

Lexington Town Hall (Old Vault Area)
11060 Hwy. 101
Lexingon, AL

Woodmont Baptist Church
2001 Darby Drive
Florence, AL

Mount Pleasant Baptist Church
8880 County Road 71 (Old Lexington Florence Road, southwest of Lexington)
Lexington, AL

First Baptist Church of Anderson
245 Church St.
Anderson, AL

Rogersville United Methodist Church
51 Turner Lindsey Road
Rogersville, AL

Rogersville Church of Christ
450 College Street (County Road 26)
Rogersville, AL

First Baptist Church of Rogersville
222 College Street (County Road 26)
Rogersville, AL

Pleasant Hill United Methodist Church
2705 County Rd 222
Florence, AL 35633

Elgin United Methodist Church
2743 Hwy 101
Elgin, AL

LAWRENCE COUNTY

Roy Coffee Park
3581 Jefferson Street
Courtland
Holds 96 people

First Baptist Church
Jefferson Street
Courtland
(*North Courtland residents – please feel free to use this one)

6619 County Road 81
Danville (next to the Speake Senior Center)
Holds 96 people

11720 Main Street
Hillsboro
Holds 96 people

Chalybeate – next to Chalybeate VFD
69 County Road 296
Hillsboro
Holds 96 people

14201 Court Street
Moulton
Holds 720 people

Wren Community Shelter
(Behind Pleasant Grove Church)
11440 Alabama Highway 33
Moulton
Holds 96 people

Mount Hope Senior Center
3142 County Road 460
Mount Hope
Holds 96 people

7042 Alabama Highway 101
(Hatton community – at the Hatton Senior Center)
Town Creek
Holds 96 people

Red Bank Park
1933 County Road 314
Town Creek
Holds 96 people

1025 Wallace Street
Town Creek
Holds 192 people

Veterans Memorial Park
6229 County Road 214
Trinity
Holds 96 people

LIMESTONE COUNTY

Ardmore City Hall
25844 Main St.
Ardmore, TN 38449
Holds 150 people

Ardmore Public Shelter
29910 Park Avenue (across from the Boys and Girls Club)
Ardmore, AL
Holds 300 people

Clements Community Safe Room
9158 U.S. Hwy. 72 W., Athens, AL 35611
Holds approximately 100 people

Community shelter/East Limestone area
Basement of Bethel Church of Christ
Intersection of Bledsoe Road and Capshaw Road
26772 Capshaw Road
Athens, AL 35613

Good Shepherd United Methodist Church
1418 Old Railroad Bed Road
Madison, AL 35757-6613
Open when there is a watch or warning issued for Madison or Limestone counties

Goodsprings Community Shelter
33634 AL Hwy. 99, Anderson, AL 35610
Holds 150 people

Lester Community Shelter
30306 Lester Rd., Lester, AL 35647
Holds 100 people

Owens Elementary School
21465 AL Hwy. 99, Athens, AL 35611
Holds 600 people
Will be open to the public after school hours only

Pleasant Grove Safe Room
9080 Upper Snake Road, Athens, AL 35614
Holds 150 people

Ark of Promise Church Safe Room
15199 Browns Ferry Road, Reid, AL 35611
Holds 200 people

West Limestone High School
10945 School House Rd., Lester, AL 35647
Holds 1,000 people
Will be open to the public after school hours only

LINCOLN COUNTY, TN

Belleville Community Center

Blanche School
1649 Ardmore Hwy

Boonshill Community Center
8o Red Oak Road
Fayetteville, TN

Delrose Fire Station
1 Front Street
Delrose, TN

Fayetteville Municipal Building
East side Square
Fayetteville, TN

Flintville First Baptist Church
200 Flintville Rd

Flintville School
36 Flintville School Rd.

Lincoln County Courthouse
On the square
Fayetteville, TN

Lincoln County High School
Hwy 231/431
Fayetteville, TN

Mimosa Coummunity Center
464 Mimosa Rd

Park City Church of Christ
42 McDougal Road
Fayetteville, TN
(931) 433-7691

Petersburg Town Hall
120 East Side Square
Petersburg, TN

State Line Church of Christ
Hwy 231-431S

Stewarts Chapel Church
Stewarts Chapel Rd

MADISON COUNTY

Visit sheltermadison.com for information on storm shelters. Madison County does not operate public shelters, but here is a list of shelters run by municipalities, churches and community groups. They are open to the public. Most do not allow pets, though.

Faith Presbyterian Church
5003 Whitesburg Drive
Huntsville, AL 35803
Will hold about 40 people. Rooms located at south end of the building which is handicap accessible. Currently open when tornado threat coincides with normal office hours or church service times.

James Clemens High School
Madison, AL
Capacity: 500 people
*Handicap accessible, pets allowed in carriers/crates

New Hope
5507 Main Drive, New Hope AL 35760
just across from Town Hall
2 shelters, located side by side
Will hold around 300 people total
No pets allowed, only service animals

New Hope United Methodist Church
5351 Main Drive, New Hope
Holds around 100 people

Hopewell Missionary Baptist Church
292 Cemetery Road
New Market
Will opening as shelter after tornado warning is issued in Limestone County

Good Shepherd United Methodist Church
1418 Old Railroad Bed Road
Madison, AL 35757-6613
Capacity: 100 people
Open when there is a tornado watch or warning issued for Madison or Limestone counties. Call (256) 232-3331, option 3 (if the shelter is open, the shelter phone will be manned.) No pets allowed. Please make other arrangements for your pets before severe weather arrives.

Harvest Youth Club
230 Lockhart Road
Harvest, AL 35749
*Shelter opens any time there is a tornado watch issued in Limestone County. Above-ground shelter, holds 125 people; 1 bag per person, no pets, only service animals
Phone number is (256) 217-0320 – but phone is not located in shelter, so if they’re inside, they won’t be able to answer.

Flint River Baptist Church
12945 Hwy 231/431 North, Hazel Green (next to Meridianville Middle School)
Church will open when a tornado watch is issued and remain open as long as needed
Enter through the “Student Entrance” door located at the back of the building
Pets are allowed in carriers
(256) 828-3692
Shelter holds 150 people

Murphy Hill Baptist Church
626 Murphy Hill Road, Toney, AL 35773
Has 5 shelters, each hold about 12 people
(256) 828-3171

Parker Chapel United Methodist Church
28670 Powell Road
Madison, AL 35756
Underground shelter – holds about 50 people

The Madison County EMA does not operate any public shelters. After the tornadoes of April 2011, the county made the decision to distribute FEMA grant money to individuals to install storm shelters in private homes. The county is not affiliated with the shelters listed above.

MARSHALL COUNTY

Asbury Martling
4059 Martling Rd, Albertville
By Martling Senior Center

Claysville
22165 US Hwy 431, Guntersville
By Cedar Lodge Center

Douglas
165 Hwy 168, Douglas
By Douglas Town Hall

Georgia Mountain
2485 Georgia Mtn Rd, Guntersville
By Georgia Mtn VFD

Grant
307 2nd Ave West, Grant
(by Grant Recreation Center)

Grant
21 1st Ave West, Grant
By D2 Shop

Hebron
90 Hebron School Rd, Grant
By Hebron VFD

Martling Senior Center
Albertville

Mt. Pleasant
5743 Simpson Point Rd, Grant

Nixon Chapel
7925 Nixon Chapel Rd, Horton
By Nixon Chapel VFD

Pleasant Grove
7275 Section Line Road, Albertville
By Pleasant Grove VFD

Riverview
1345 Cha-La-Kee Road, Guntersville
By Riverview Campground

Scant City
3850 Eddy Scant Rd, Arab
By D1 Shop

Swearengin
5120 Swearengin Rd, Swearengin
By Swearengin VFD

Union Grove
3680 Union Grove Rd, Union Grove
By Union Grove Town Hall

Wakefield
777 South Sauty Rd, Langston
By Wakefield VFD

Wakefield Volunteer Fire Department
Whitesville
118 Whitesville Church Rd, Boaz

MORGAN COUNTY

Danville Volunteer Fire Department
5798 Hwy 36 West
Danville, AL 35619
2 shelters at this location – both hold 98 people

Decatur City Hall
(Basement)
Decatur, AL

Abundant Life Church
524 Lafayette St. NE
Decatur, AL 35601
(256) 345-9930
Basement holds 125-150 people

Somerville City Hall
192 Broad Street
Somerville, AL 35670
Holds 96 people – no smoking, no pets

Cutoff Road, half a mile south of Alabama 67 in the Cross Creek housing area
Somerville, AL
Holds 96 people – no smoking, no pets

Massey Volunteer Fire Department
386 Evergreen Road
Danville, AL
Holds 98 people

Morgan City Community Shelter
Located behind the new Brindlee Mountain Fire Department facility
U.S. 231
Open any time a Tornado Watch or Tornado Warning is issued for Morgan County

Morgan County EMA
(first floor of Morgan County Courthouse)
302 Lee Street NE
Decatur, AL

Priceville Town Hall (Basement)
Priceville, AL

Punkin Center Volunteer Fire Department
116 Kirby Bridge Road
Danville, AL
Holds 98 people

Trinity Town Hall
35 Preston Drive (near the corner of Preston Drive and Seneca Drive)
Trinity, AL 35673
Holds 98 people