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Tornado Shelters and Storm Shelters

Science Suggests More Active Tornadoes than Ever Before-Tornado Shelters are More Important than Ever

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Tornado Shelters, More Important than Ever

While there isn’t a long-term trend in the number of U.S. tornadoes stronger than EF0, several recent studies suggest the time distribution of those tornadoes and their tendency to cluster in outbreaks may be changing.  And more activity means having a plan in place to survive a storm is more important than ever.  And luckily, tornado shelters are less expensive and easier to install than in years past.

EF1 Tornado Days and Active Tornado Days

Fewer Tornado Days, But More Active Days

When eliminating EF0 tornadoes from yearly counts, which have steadily risen over the past few decades due to more extensive spotter networks, the implementation of Doppler radar, and advanced technology such as smartphones and social media, there is essentially no long-term yearly trend in the raw number of EF1 and stronger tornadoes.

However, the number of days with at least one EF1+ tornado in the U.S. has fallen from an average of 150 such days in the early 1970s to around 100 days in the first decade of the 21st century, according to an October 2014 study in the journal Science.

However, the study by noted tornado researchers Dr. Harold Brooks of the National Severe Storms Laboratory, Greg Carbin of NOAA’s Storm Prediction Center, and Dr. Patrick Marsh, also of NOAA/SPC, found the number of days with a large number of tornadoes is actually increasing over time.

“The frequency of days with more than 30 EF1+ (tornadoes) has increased from 0.5 to 1 days per year in the 1960s and 1970s to 3 days per year over the past decade,” says the Brooks et al. study.

In essence, we have fewer days with tornadoes, but are packing more of them into the days we have. “Approximately 20 percent of the annual tornadoes in the most recent decade have occurred on the three biggest days of each year,” says the Brooks et al. study.  So knowing what to do when severe weather strikes, and ideally, having a residential storm shelter, a community storm shelter easily accessible in your city, or a corporate storm shelter or commercial tornado shelter at your business or school is more important than ever.

Another recent study by Dr. James Elsner not only found a similar clustering of tornadoes into fewer days, but also a spatial clustering of tornadoes on those very active days.

“It appears that the risk of big tornado days with densely concentrated clusters of tornadoes is increasing,” Elsner says in the July 2014 study.
Large Swings in Monthly, Yearly Numbers

These clusters cause more damage in a defined area.  So instead of being concerned about a single rotation, and potentially feeling relieved after a tornado passes, it is extremely important to be more vigilant and aware of other tornadoes in the area.  Residential tornado shelters and community storm shelters are the best option to protect yourself from these unpredictable storms.

For only the second time since 1950, the first three weeks of March 2015 passed without a single tornado anywhere in the U.S.
Yet as recently as 2011, almost 1,700 tornadoes ripped across the nation, including 349 tornadoes in a four-day outbreak from April 25-28, the costliest tornado outbreak in U.S. history.

While year-to-year variability has long been prevalent in U.S. tornado counts, a 2014 study by Dr. Michael Tippett found volatility, a term he uses for variability in tornado counts, has increased since 2000.

Furthermore, the Brooks et al. study found the tendency for more monthly extreme highs and lows in EF1+ tornado counts in recent years.

“Excluding the zero-tornado months, there are more extreme months in the most recent 15 years of the database (1999-2013) than in the first 45 years,” says Brooks et al. 2014.

In other words, we’ve seen extreme high monthly tornado counts (758 tornadoes in April 2011, for example) and extreme low monthly tornado counts (March 2015, for example) more often over the past 15 years, a trend that may continue.

Of course, low tornado count years do not preclude significant tornadoes or tornado outbreaks. Despite the lowest three-year tornado count on record from 2012-2014, we still had destructive outbreaks in March 2012, in May 2013 (Moore and El Reno, Oklahoma), and April 2014 (Vilonia, Arkansas).

When Tornado Season Shifts Into Gear, Skewing Earlier in the Year-The Time to Install an Above Ground Tornado Shelter is NOW

Tornadoes can occur any time of year the overlap of sufficient moisture, atmospheric instability — relatively cold, dry air aloft overlying warm, humid air near the Earth’s surface — and a strong source of lift such as a warm front, dryline, strong jet-stream disturbance occur.

Because of that, it’s difficult to define a tornado season on a national scale as distinctly as, say, a hurricane season.

However, Brooks et al. tracked as a metric the occurrence of the year’s 50th EF1+ tornado to get a sense of whether the timing of the ramp-up in U.S. tornadoes typically seen in spring is changing.

While the long-term average date (March 22) hasn’t changed, Brooks et al. found a marked increase in the number of “late-start” and “early-start” years since the late 1990s. The four latest starts and five of the ten earliest starts to the season all occurred in the 1999-2013 period. These range from late January (1999 and 2008) to late April (2002, 2003, 2004 and 2010).

In essence, even the date the season kicks into a higher gear is becoming more volatile-so don’t wait to install your tornado shelter.

Climate Change Role?

Now, the toughest question: Is climate change playing a role in the increasing variability of the nation’s tornadoes?

The short answer is, possibly.

The challenge in answering this question is linking short-fuse events like tornadoes and tornado outbreaks to long-term changes in atmospheric parameters generally conducive for severe thunderstorms, such as instability and wind shear.

Studies by Dr. Jeff Trapp and Dr. Noah Diffenbaugh, among others, suggest atmospheric instability, driven by increased moisture, is expected to be greater in a warming climate. However, wind shear, crucial for the formation of supercells which can produce the strongest tornadoes, may diminish overall, but may feature more days with higher wind shear.

Therefore, the overall environment may be more conducive for severe thunderstorms (with large hail and damaging winds), but it remains unclear whether the number of tornadoes or even strong tornadoes would necessarily rise in a warming world.

This brings up an interesting possibility, a seasonal outlook for severe weather, similar to hurricane season outlooks.
“I suspect that ultimately knowing if a severe weather season will be above, below, or near normal would be important for reinsurance portfolios as an increasing amount of money is spent on hail and wind claims,” said Dr. Patrick Marsh from NOAA/SPC.

The best advice is don’t think that you can predict the severity of tornado season or even when it begins, and definitely do not wait until after a storm strikes to realize the need to purchase a storm shelter.  Tornado shelters of all sizes are more affordable than ever and Safe-T-Shelter even partners with local credit unions for financing.  Everyone deserves the right to protect their family from unpredictable storms.  So whether it is a residential storm shelter, a community storm shelter, a commercial storm shelter or a corporate storm shelter, Safe-T-Shelter can help, and our 20+ years experience means you can have confidence in our products and our longevity.

November Torndoes-Storm Shelters and Tornado Shelters

Second Tornado Season-Have a Tornado Shelter Plan in Place

Autumn Tornadoes are Extremely Common

Of course Spring is known for its severe thunderstorms that can produce violent tornadoes. However, it’s not the only season known for tornadoes. Fall is considered the “second” tornado season.

“The second half of October, and especially November, can often be a second season for tornadoes and severe thunderstorms,” said tornado expert Dr. Greg Forbes. “In many ways, this is the counterpart to spring, when strong fronts and upper-air systems march across the United States. When enough warm, moist air accompanies these weather systems, the unstable conditions yield severe thunderstorms and sometimes tornadoes.”

People need not have a false sense of security about severe weather and tornadoes simply because the seasons change.  It is extremely important to have a plan in place to keep you, your family, your coworkers, your city, etc. safe during an unpredictable storm.  And Safe-T-Shelter Storm Shelters are the perfect solution for residential storm shelters, community storm shelters, and commercial storm shelters.

One benefit to the cooler temperatures is that installing community storm shelters or corporate tornado shelters is often a faster process due to less demand.

November Torndoes-Storm Shelters and Tornado Shelters
Second Tornado Season: October and November

While most of the largest tornado outbreaks still occur in spring, fall has its share of storms as well. Dr. Forbes examined the storm statistics and found six of the largest 55 known tornado outbreaks occurred in October and November.

May is still the peak month for tornadoes. Up to 52 percent of September’s tornado outbreaks are due to land-falling tropical storms and hurricanes.

October and November’s tornadoes are caused by upper-level troughs (dips in the jet stream) and cold fronts affecting the South and sometimes the Midwest.

The map above shows how many tornadoes have been confirmed by the National Weather Service during the month of November from 1950-2014. Texas has the most, but when adjusted for total area, Mississippi has the most, followed closely by Louisiana and Alabama.

As the map suggests, second-season tornado outbreaks are most common in the Gulf Coast states, where temperature and humidity levels tend to be higher. They can sometimes spread north to the Ohio Valley and southern Great Lakes.

On rare occasions, weak tornadoes can form on the West Coast in November.

Greatest Second-Season Tornado Outbreak: Nov. 21-23, 1992 – 105 Tornadoes

States affected: 13 total, from Texas to the Carolinas.
26 people were killed and 638 were injured.
The outbreak caused $713 million in damage; the Houston area was hit especially hard.
It was rated a top-five worst tornado outbreak in any month since 1950 by Dr. Forbes.
White Plains, Georgia, was practically leveled by an F4 tornado on November 22, 1992.

This outbreak started the Saturday before Thanksgiving 1992 in Houston. An incredible seven tornadoes were spawned in the span of just two hours in the metro area, with three twisters on the ground at one particular time in Harris County. The strongest tornado, rated F4, destroyed more than 200 homes on Houston’s east side. This was the strongest tornado to hit the Houston metro since 1950.
Another EF4 tornado went on a 128-mile-long rampage through Mississippi overnight Saturday into Sunday morning, Nov. 22. The storm claimed 12 lives and damaged or destroyed more than 700 homes.

Fifteen tornadoes touched down in Indiana that Sunday, the largest November outbreak in state records. One tornado was an F4 in southeast Indiana and northern Kentucky. Not to be left out, other F4 tornadoes carved a swath through the far northwest suburbs of Atlanta, and also struck near White Plains and Lake Oconee, Georgia.

Finally, a pair of F3 tornadoes in North Carolina killed two and injured 59.

The message is clear, do not get complacent about tornadoes at any time.  The vast majority of the US is at risk of tornadoes for the vast majority of the year.  Have a plan in place and if you do not have a safe place to go, please contact Safe-T-Shelter to assist in your needs of a residential storm shelter, community storm shelter, or a commercial storm shelter / corporate storm shelter for your employees.  With over 20 years experience and countless storm tested shelters, by choosing Safe-T-Shelter you can be confident and feel safe, no matter how strong the storm.

Don’t Wait for Tragedy to See the Need for a Storm Shelter from Safe-T-Shelter

Above Ground Steel Storm Shelter Manufacturer

Is an Above Ground Storm Shelter the Best Choice During a Tornado?

Recent Technological Advances have made Above Ground Shelters the Right Choice for Most People in Need of Storm Protection

In the all too common scenario that a tornado warning is issued for your area, what do the experts feel are the best choices for avoiding injury or loss of life?

Options range from seeking shelter in basements to an above ground storm shelter to below-ground storm shelters. There are pros and cons to all of these options, but one option does provide the best option to protect your family.

Most experts now agree that your odds for surviving a direct hit with a strong tornado (EF-4 or EF-5) are greatest in a tested above ground storm shelter built to FEMA specifications.

Above ground storm shelters tested by the Texas Tech wind institute and built to FEMA specifications can be rated to survive an EF-5 storm, they pose less risk of entrapment when compared to underground storm shelters, do not pose a risk of flooding from the common breaking of water lines during a tornado, that an in-ground storm shelter does, and also is much more easily accessible to the elderly or those with handicaps making maneuvering stairs difficult or impossible.  Additionally, above ground storm shelters have fewer installation limitations.  Nearly any piece of property can be made eligible for installation of an above ground tornado shelter.  All these reasons make it easy to understand why most experts prefer and recommend an above ground storm shelter to families looking to provide protection from an unpredictable storm.

If an above-ground safe room is not available but a basement is present, you should head downstairs and get under sturdy furniture or a stairwell.

In violent tornadoes, sometimes the floor collapses or is swept away and debris can then be thrown into the basement.  So they are not the best option, but if a storm is heading your way, they can still be the best option available.

For existing homes that do not have a basement, retrofitting a small, interior room or adding an above ground safe room within a large room or even under an existing stairway, is a cost effective alternative.  Alternatively, an above ground storm shelter can be installed outdoors on an existing concrete pad/foundation, or a new foundation can be poured to safely secure an outdoor tornado shelter.

What if you don’t have an Above Ground Safe Room?

Storm Tested Shelter in an EF5 Tornado

Storm Tested Shelter in an EF5 Tornado- Our Tornado Shelters have saved countless lives.

But what should you do if you do not have access to a tornado shelter on your property?  Studies have shown that when much of a home has been destroyed, often the only surviving part of the dwelling is a small interior room, such as a closet or bathroom. This has to do with more supportive wall framing versus ceiling surface area.

In strong tornadoes, often the entire roof and/or upper floors are removed from the dwelling, which exposes the remaining walls to more stress and risk of failure.

Even if the interior walls remain standing, they could be penetrated by high-velocity projectiles.

An approved above ground safe room has reinforced walls, ceiling and door.

Whether you seek refuge in a safe room or closet, there are additional precautions you can take.

According to a story published by The Birmingham News, a bike helmet, an infant car seat, sturdy shoes or boots and a heavy quilt or coat can offer extra protection from shards of glass, splinters and other airborne objects.

For those living in mobile homes, you should seek safe shelter elsewhere.  A mobile home offers little protection from a tornado.  But again, a storm shelter can be installed outside of a mobile home to provide protection when the next storm strike.  We currently offer financing plans through our partners for little interest, making it accessible to families with varying budgets.

No matter where you live, a storm shelter could one day save your family!

Despite a low risk in parts of the nation, tornadoes have occurred in all 50 states.  And in recent years, areas that have been typically low risk have seen large increases in tornadoes.

According to National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the average lead time for tornado warnings is only 13 minutes.  So when you are under a tornado warning, you should implement your tornado plan immediately.  There is no time to wait, and you should always have a practiced plan in place.

There are some people who do not have a means of transportation, are handicapped or simply have no place to go.  And those people should follow our recommendations above and react with the best options available to them.

Escaping a tornado in a vehicle is not recommended unless the absence of traffic and the availability of road options allow you to move quickly at right angles relative to the tornado’s path.

The meteorological community including the National Weather Service provide heads-up alerts sometimes days in advance of potential severe weather and tornado outbreaks.

However, planning ahead should not wait until the day of an expected outbreak or during the heart of the severe weather season. Tornadoes can occur at any time of the year, and any time of the day.

In the case of mobile homes, or other storm-vulnerable housing, planning ahead as far as possible is necessary in terms of constructing, locating and traveling to a safe area.

It should be the topic of community, family and workplace discussion. There may already be approved safe areas and information available within your township, school or job site.  If you are responsible for your school or workplace safety, we also offer commercial storm shelters and community storm shelters, with many of these already scattered across the country in high risk areas.

You can survive a tornado!

People should assume the worst will happen when a tornado warning is issued.

Take responsibility for your safety. Trust the warnings. You might spend some time in a storm shelter unnecessarily on occasion, but the tornado warnings have become good enough that they need to be taken seriously.”

If schools and workplaces have no plan (for tornadoes), people should demand that a plan be developed.  And we are here to help you approach your school or workplace decision makers, and can provide you with a plethora of literature describing the many options and also provide information about the availability of grants and rental arrangements to offset costs.

If you are building a new home, consider the addition of an approved above ground safe room or nearby outdoor, above ground storm shelter with adequate means of ventilation.

If you live in a mobile home park, consider approaching the owner as a group about building an above ground storm shelter.  Again, we are glad to help facilitate that interaction by calling on your behalf, or providing materials to help ease the discussion.

In light of the trend of fatalities over the years during tornado outbreaks, there have been vast improvements in public awareness thanks to advanced warnings in the public and private sector.

However, since the number of fatalities from tornadoes is still far from zero, much more improvement is needed on behalf of the public’s education, practice and preventative measures.

Safe-T-Shelter, StormShelter.com, and Aqua Marine Enterprises (the manufacturer of Safe-T-Shelter storm shelters) want to keep you, your family, your work, and your community safe in an unpredictable storm.

Safe-T-Shelter is here to help, and our more than 21 years of experience protecting families, communities, and businesses across the country means that we are the safe choice to help protect you no matter what your unique situation might be.

 

 

Safe Rooms are the New ‘Must Have’ in New Construction

Residential Storm Shelters or Safe Rooms

Dual-Use Safe Rooms

A room where you can store jewelry, guns, send your email–and survive 250 mph tornado winds? It’s called a storm shelter or “safe room” and is a surprisingly popular home renovation, even during downturns in the real estate market.  But especially now with home sales spiking across the country.  The biggest market increase has been see with more people adding storm shelters and safe rooms to the design process for their newly constructed homes.

These aren’t the dank bunkers your father hid in. Many of the new shelters are above-ground storm shelters prefabricated and installed on concrete pads inside a garage or as a stand alone in your yard, or even installed inside the home. They are prefabricated storm shelters or custom safe rooms based on your needs and often lead double lives as offices, tool sheds, or even as wine cellars in less turbulent times.

Storm Shelters for New Construction

Many home builders include safe rooms /storm shelters in new custom homes, calling it a “must-have item.” The Federal Emergency Management Agency, which publishes safe room construction guidelines, says that information is now the agency’s “most requested” publication. And the National Storm Shelter Association estimates U.S. storm shelters number in the low millions, most of them having been added in the last decade.  And for many rural communities, it is becoming common for municipalities to install large community storm shelters for its citizens.

The aging 76 million Baby Boomers are a driving force behind much of the boom (pardon the pun) in storm shelter sales . Above-ground storm shelter designs are particularly popular among families with elderly members who might not be able to navigate stairs or make it across the yard into a bunker quickly. And recent studies have shown that above-ground shelters are just as safe, and in many cases safer than their underground storm shelter counterparts (Article discussing the safety of above ground storm shelters).  Sizes typically range from around 50 square feet to upward of 200 square feet on larger models and some can be equipped with electricity, restrooms, and other creature comforts based on need or desire.

Tornado Alley is not the Only Area Showing Increases in Storm Shelter Purchases

While storm-prone states are key target markets, many people in states not known for tornado outbreaks are purchasing the shelters for peace of mind.  And recent NOAA data has shown that nearly all states have had devastating tornadoes in recent years.

Intrigued? Check out our gallery of photos, or contact us for more information.

Community Storm Shelters

Tennessee Valley Tornado Shelter Locations (separated by County)

List updated April 2015

CHEROKEE COUNTY

Industrial Blvd, next to Leesburg Town Hall
Leesburg, AL
Holds 150-200 people

COLBERT COUNTY

14439 County Line Road
Ford City/Leighton
Holds 100+ people

8856 Main Street
Leighton
Holds 100+ people

1448 Jackson Highway
Littleville
Holds 100+ people

1211 2nd Street
Cherokee
Holds 100+ people

Colbert County EMA Office
120 West 5th Street
Tuscumbia
Holds about 50 people

Intersection of County Line Road and 2nd Street (Underwood Crossroads)
12491 County Line Road
Leighton
Holds about 80 people

Rose Trail Park
37 Rose Trail Park
Riverton (next to Riverton VFD)
Holds about 80 people

Nitrate City Volunteer Fire Dept.
1341 Alabama Avenue
Muscle Shoals
Holds about 80 people

Highway 247 Volunteer Fire Dept.
4639 Highway 247
Tuscumbia
Holds 40 people

2848 Denton Road
Tuscumbia
Holds 40 people

County Yard, Tuscumbia
914 South Hickory Street
Tuscumbia
Holds about 80 people

Colbert Alloys Park
191 Alloys Park Lane
Muscle Shoals
Holds about 80 people

Updated April 7, 2014. Colbert County has plans to add 14 more shelters in the next few years.

CULLMAN COUNTY

Baileyton
112 Fairview Rd
Capacity: 96
No pets

Chapel Village/Jones Chapel
74 County Rd 1034, Cullman, AL 35057
Capacity 90-100
No pets

Cullman County Courthouse Basement
500 2nd Ave SW, Cullman, AL 35055
No pets

Dodge City Town Hall – basement
130 Howard Circle, Hanceville, AL 35077
(basement was built to storm shelter standards)

Dodge City Volunteer Fire Department
7150 County Rd 223
Capacity: 96
No pets

Fairview Housing Authority
501 1st Ave SW
Capacity: 90-100
No pets

Garden City Town Hall
501 1st Ave SW
Capacity: 450+ people
No pets

Good Hope City Hall (Basement)
134 Town Hall Dr, Cullman, AL 35057
Capacity: 100
No pets

Good Hope freestanding shelter behind City Hall
Accessed via Madison Dr.
Capacity: 96
No pets

Good Hope Volunteer Fire Department #2
301 Day Gap Rd
Capacity: 96
No pets

Hanceville – three shelters:
202 Bangor Avenue SE
1407 Commercial Street SE
203 Michelle Street NW
No pets

Smith Lake Park
420 County Rd 385
Capacity: 96
No pets

South Vinemont
88 Ridgeway St
Capacity: 96
No pets

Vinemont Providence Volunteer Fire Department #1
576 County Rd 1355, Vinemont, AL 35179
Capacity: 200
No pets

Vinemont Providence Volunteer Fire Department #2
60 Ridgeway St
Capacity: 200
No pets

West Point
4050 County Rd 1141
Capacity: 96
No pets

DEKALB COUNTY

Crossville, at the fire department
96 people

DeKalb County Activities Building
Fort Payne
(basement – can hold about 200 people)

Fyffe Senior Center
413 Graves Street
(Holds about 20 people)

Fyffe Town Hall
Holds 96 people

Fyffe Church of God
778 Main Street, Fyffe
(256) 623-3822
(please call first to see if shelter is open)

Geraldine Town Hall
96 people

Greenbriar Avenue
Henagar (holds 96 people)

Main Street, Powell (across from Town Hall)
Holds 96 people

Northeast Alabama Community College
Rainsville
Opening at 9:00 p.m.
Shelter holds 1000-1500 people

Plainview School
Shelter can hold 600-700 people

Shiloh, at fire department
96 people

Sylvania, next to fire department
14 Enterprise Street
Sylvania, AL 35988
Holds 96 people

Upper Sand Mountain Parish (private-run shelter)
24474 Sylvania Road
Sylvania, AL 35988

ETOWAH COUNTY

The Gadsden/Etowah County EMA has a website where you can see all open shelters on a map to find the closest to you. Click here to view that map.

Bethlehem Missionary Baptist Church
5950 Sardis Rd, Boaz, Al 35956
Handicap Accessible

Black Creek Volunteer Fire Department
20 Styles Bridge Rd, Collinsville, AL 35961
Handicap Accessible
Pets Allowed

Etowah Baptist Association
853 Walnut St.
Downtown Gadsden
Handicap Accessible

First Baptist Church Southside
2560 Mountain View Dr, Southside, AL 35907
Handicap Accessible
Pets Allowed with Crates

First Baptist Church of Hokes Bluff
5052 Main St, Hokes Bluff, AL 35903
Handicap Accessible

Gadsden Public Library
254 College St.
Downtown Gadsden
Handicap Accessible
Pets Allowed

Goodyear Heights Baptist Church
608 Kaying Rd. N
E. Gadsden/Glencoe
Handicap Accessible

New Bethel First Congressional Methodist Church
6673 Main St, Hokes Bluff, AL 35903
Handicap Accessible
Pets Allowed with Crates

NE Etowah Community Center
3733 US Hwy 411 N
Nothern Etowah County, Near Gaston School
Handicap Accessible
Pets Allowed
FEMA P-361 Compliant

Paden Baptist Church
900 Padenreich Ave
Near Gadsden State Community College
Handicap Accessible

Stowers Hill Baptist Church
407 Ninth Ave. SW, Attalla, AL 35954
Handicap Accessible
Pets Allowed with Crates

Young’s Chapel Methodist Church
44 Youngs Chapel Rd
Hokes Bluff/Piedmont
Handicap Accessible
Pets Allowed with Crates

FRANKLIN COUNTY

Shelter behind Hodges City Hall
1842 Hwy. 172
Hodges

Phil Campbell Community Center
132 Sherry Bryce Dr.
Phil Campbell

Blue Springs Fire Department
Highway 75
Phil Campbell

Vina Fire Department
79 Church Street
Vina

Red Bay Water Park
640 2nd St NE
Red Bay

Red Bay Old Airport
627 9th Ave NW
Red Bay

Russellville Park & Rec Center
204 Ash Ave
Russellville

511 Gaines Ave
Russellville

Pleasant Site Fire Department
2785 Hwy. 90
Pleasant Site

Burnout Fire Department
75 Hwy 224
Burnout

Shelter Near Belgreen School Gym
14141 Hwy 187
Belgreen

JACKSON COUNTY

Bridgeport Shelter
602 Broadway Ave, Bridgeport, AL

Bridgeport Shelter
2105 5th St, Bridgeport, AL

Dutton Town Hall
69 Browntown Road (Basement)
Holds 250-300 people

Jackson County Courthouse (basement)
123 East Laurel Street
Scottsboro
(256) 574-9330
Occupancy: 100

Langston Safe Room
9277 County Rd. 67, Langston, AL

Section City Hall
72 Dutton Rd, Section, AL
Basement

Paint Rock Shelter
3227 U.S. Highway 72, Paint Rock, AL

Stevenson Shelter
905 E. 2nd Street, Stevenson, AL

Stevenson Shelter
802 Kentucky Ave, Stevenson, AL

LAUDERDALE COUNTY

North Wood United Methodist Church
1129 N Wood Ave
Florence, AL

Petersville Church of Christ
3601 Cloverdale Rd.
Florence, AL

Underwood/Petersville Community Center
840 County Road7
Florence, AL

Stoney Point Church of Christ
1755 County Road 24
Florence, AL

Williams Chapel Presbyterian Church
6401 County Road 1
Waterloo, AL

Killen United Methodist Church
201 J.C. Mauldin Hwy.
Killen, AL

Bank Independent
11250 Hwy. 101
Lexington, AL

Lexington Town Hall (Old Vault Area)
11060 Hwy. 101
Lexingon, AL

Woodmont Baptist Church
2001 Darby Drive
Florence, AL

Mount Pleasant Baptist Church
8880 County Road 71 (Old Lexington Florence Road, southwest of Lexington)
Lexington, AL

First Baptist Church of Anderson
245 Church St.
Anderson, AL

Rogersville United Methodist Church
51 Turner Lindsey Road
Rogersville, AL

Rogersville Church of Christ
450 College Street (County Road 26)
Rogersville, AL

First Baptist Church of Rogersville
222 College Street (County Road 26)
Rogersville, AL

Pleasant Hill United Methodist Church
2705 County Rd 222
Florence, AL 35633

Elgin United Methodist Church
2743 Hwy 101
Elgin, AL

LAWRENCE COUNTY

Roy Coffee Park
3581 Jefferson Street
Courtland
Holds 96 people

First Baptist Church
Jefferson Street
Courtland
(*North Courtland residents – please feel free to use this one)

6619 County Road 81
Danville (next to the Speake Senior Center)
Holds 96 people

11720 Main Street
Hillsboro
Holds 96 people

Chalybeate – next to Chalybeate VFD
69 County Road 296
Hillsboro
Holds 96 people

14201 Court Street
Moulton
Holds 720 people

Wren Community Shelter
(Behind Pleasant Grove Church)
11440 Alabama Highway 33
Moulton
Holds 96 people

Mount Hope Senior Center
3142 County Road 460
Mount Hope
Holds 96 people

7042 Alabama Highway 101
(Hatton community – at the Hatton Senior Center)
Town Creek
Holds 96 people

Red Bank Park
1933 County Road 314
Town Creek
Holds 96 people

1025 Wallace Street
Town Creek
Holds 192 people

Veterans Memorial Park
6229 County Road 214
Trinity
Holds 96 people

LIMESTONE COUNTY

Ardmore City Hall
25844 Main St.
Ardmore, TN 38449
Holds 150 people

Ardmore Public Shelter
29910 Park Avenue (across from the Boys and Girls Club)
Ardmore, AL
Holds 300 people

Clements Community Safe Room
9158 U.S. Hwy. 72 W., Athens, AL 35611
Holds approximately 100 people

Community shelter/East Limestone area
Basement of Bethel Church of Christ
Intersection of Bledsoe Road and Capshaw Road
26772 Capshaw Road
Athens, AL 35613

Good Shepherd United Methodist Church
1418 Old Railroad Bed Road
Madison, AL 35757-6613
Open when there is a watch or warning issued for Madison or Limestone counties

Goodsprings Community Shelter
33634 AL Hwy. 99, Anderson, AL 35610
Holds 150 people

Lester Community Shelter
30306 Lester Rd., Lester, AL 35647
Holds 100 people

Owens Elementary School
21465 AL Hwy. 99, Athens, AL 35611
Holds 600 people
Will be open to the public after school hours only

Pleasant Grove Safe Room
9080 Upper Snake Road, Athens, AL 35614
Holds 150 people

Ark of Promise Church Safe Room
15199 Browns Ferry Road, Reid, AL 35611
Holds 200 people

West Limestone High School
10945 School House Rd., Lester, AL 35647
Holds 1,000 people
Will be open to the public after school hours only

LINCOLN COUNTY, TN

Belleville Community Center

Blanche School
1649 Ardmore Hwy

Boonshill Community Center
8o Red Oak Road
Fayetteville, TN

Delrose Fire Station
1 Front Street
Delrose, TN

Fayetteville Municipal Building
East side Square
Fayetteville, TN

Flintville First Baptist Church
200 Flintville Rd

Flintville School
36 Flintville School Rd.

Lincoln County Courthouse
On the square
Fayetteville, TN

Lincoln County High School
Hwy 231/431
Fayetteville, TN

Mimosa Coummunity Center
464 Mimosa Rd

Park City Church of Christ
42 McDougal Road
Fayetteville, TN
(931) 433-7691

Petersburg Town Hall
120 East Side Square
Petersburg, TN

State Line Church of Christ
Hwy 231-431S

Stewarts Chapel Church
Stewarts Chapel Rd

MADISON COUNTY

Visit sheltermadison.com for information on storm shelters. Madison County does not operate public shelters, but here is a list of shelters run by municipalities, churches and community groups. They are open to the public. Most do not allow pets, though.

Faith Presbyterian Church
5003 Whitesburg Drive
Huntsville, AL 35803
Will hold about 40 people. Rooms located at south end of the building which is handicap accessible. Currently open when tornado threat coincides with normal office hours or church service times.

James Clemens High School
Madison, AL
Capacity: 500 people
*Handicap accessible, pets allowed in carriers/crates

New Hope
5507 Main Drive, New Hope AL 35760
just across from Town Hall
2 shelters, located side by side
Will hold around 300 people total
No pets allowed, only service animals

New Hope United Methodist Church
5351 Main Drive, New Hope
Holds around 100 people

Hopewell Missionary Baptist Church
292 Cemetery Road
New Market
Will opening as shelter after tornado warning is issued in Limestone County

Good Shepherd United Methodist Church
1418 Old Railroad Bed Road
Madison, AL 35757-6613
Capacity: 100 people
Open when there is a tornado watch or warning issued for Madison or Limestone counties. Call (256) 232-3331, option 3 (if the shelter is open, the shelter phone will be manned.) No pets allowed. Please make other arrangements for your pets before severe weather arrives.

Harvest Youth Club
230 Lockhart Road
Harvest, AL 35749
*Shelter opens any time there is a tornado watch issued in Limestone County. Above-ground shelter, holds 125 people; 1 bag per person, no pets, only service animals
Phone number is (256) 217-0320 – but phone is not located in shelter, so if they’re inside, they won’t be able to answer.

Flint River Baptist Church
12945 Hwy 231/431 North, Hazel Green (next to Meridianville Middle School)
Church will open when a tornado watch is issued and remain open as long as needed
Enter through the “Student Entrance” door located at the back of the building
Pets are allowed in carriers
(256) 828-3692
Shelter holds 150 people

Murphy Hill Baptist Church
626 Murphy Hill Road, Toney, AL 35773
Has 5 shelters, each hold about 12 people
(256) 828-3171

Parker Chapel United Methodist Church
28670 Powell Road
Madison, AL 35756
Underground shelter – holds about 50 people

The Madison County EMA does not operate any public shelters. After the tornadoes of April 2011, the county made the decision to distribute FEMA grant money to individuals to install storm shelters in private homes. The county is not affiliated with the shelters listed above.

MARSHALL COUNTY

Asbury Martling
4059 Martling Rd, Albertville
By Martling Senior Center

Claysville
22165 US Hwy 431, Guntersville
By Cedar Lodge Center

Douglas
165 Hwy 168, Douglas
By Douglas Town Hall

Georgia Mountain
2485 Georgia Mtn Rd, Guntersville
By Georgia Mtn VFD

Grant
307 2nd Ave West, Grant
(by Grant Recreation Center)

Grant
21 1st Ave West, Grant
By D2 Shop

Hebron
90 Hebron School Rd, Grant
By Hebron VFD

Martling Senior Center
Albertville

Mt. Pleasant
5743 Simpson Point Rd, Grant

Nixon Chapel
7925 Nixon Chapel Rd, Horton
By Nixon Chapel VFD

Pleasant Grove
7275 Section Line Road, Albertville
By Pleasant Grove VFD

Riverview
1345 Cha-La-Kee Road, Guntersville
By Riverview Campground

Scant City
3850 Eddy Scant Rd, Arab
By D1 Shop

Swearengin
5120 Swearengin Rd, Swearengin
By Swearengin VFD

Union Grove
3680 Union Grove Rd, Union Grove
By Union Grove Town Hall

Wakefield
777 South Sauty Rd, Langston
By Wakefield VFD

Wakefield Volunteer Fire Department
Whitesville
118 Whitesville Church Rd, Boaz

MORGAN COUNTY

Danville Volunteer Fire Department
5798 Hwy 36 West
Danville, AL 35619
2 shelters at this location – both hold 98 people

Decatur City Hall
(Basement)
Decatur, AL

Abundant Life Church
524 Lafayette St. NE
Decatur, AL 35601
(256) 345-9930
Basement holds 125-150 people

Somerville City Hall
192 Broad Street
Somerville, AL 35670
Holds 96 people – no smoking, no pets

Cutoff Road, half a mile south of Alabama 67 in the Cross Creek housing area
Somerville, AL
Holds 96 people – no smoking, no pets

Massey Volunteer Fire Department
386 Evergreen Road
Danville, AL
Holds 98 people

Morgan City Community Shelter
Located behind the new Brindlee Mountain Fire Department facility
U.S. 231
Open any time a Tornado Watch or Tornado Warning is issued for Morgan County

Morgan County EMA
(first floor of Morgan County Courthouse)
302 Lee Street NE
Decatur, AL

Priceville Town Hall (Basement)
Priceville, AL

Punkin Center Volunteer Fire Department
116 Kirby Bridge Road
Danville, AL
Holds 98 people

Trinity Town Hall
35 Preston Drive (near the corner of Preston Drive and Seneca Drive)
Trinity, AL 35673
Holds 98 people